My trigger is when someone touches me in a completely unsexual way or touches an object that I know belongs to me. But, it can only be when I don’t tell them to touch me or if it’s not someone I deeply care about. Very specific situations like this trigger my ASMR and it’s one of the best feelings I can feel. The feeling only occurs in my scalp but I get goosebumps all over my body.
My ASMR trigger is the inside of the refrigerator. A combination of the cool sensation, the lighting , and the humming sound just takes me to paradise. My experience with ASMR began when I was a toddler. I would open the refrigerator side…sit inside & just zone out. Now I open both sides. The cool frosty mist from the freezer, the lighting from both sides, and the ahh sound the freezer makes along with the humming of the refrigerator side intensifies the tingles
Maria has become one of the most recognizable faces of ASMR. One of her videos was the first in the community to hit a million YouTube views, and she produces a huge amount of fantastic content. In this video you don't see her face at all, but you get to enjoy her voice, her slight accent, and her gentle hand movements. Plus, you'll learn how to fold the HECK out of some towels.
A minor detail, I know, but I’d really appreciate it if you wouldn’t call the head massager an “orgasmatron”. There are enough attempts by the media, both advertent and inadvertent, to sexualize ASMR, and we really don’t want newcommers to get the wrong idea. Those who experience ASMR may be able to easily look past the dis-analogy, but for those who don’t, it’s little things like this that make it that much harder.
An Instagram user who runs a repost account, meaning that they do not personally create any chalk-eating videos, told Motherboard in an Instagram direct message that they believe most people who make "chalk-eating" videos do not actually eat the chalk (The user asked that Motherboard withhold their account handle because certain members of the chalk-eating ASMR community have been bullied.)

And then there’s the cooking. You can watch as someone on the ASMR cooking channel Sound Croquette makes mozzarella sticks, Nutella crepes, fried chicken and more. In some cooking videos, the artist whispers all the while. In others there is no talking, only the sights and rhythmic sounds of cooking — frying, cracking an egg, boiling water, chopping, mixing and stirring.
However, the truly novel findings came from a second experiment, when 110 participants viewed ASMR videos while connected to biological feedback machinery. After watching the videos, the heart rates of people with ASMR slowed on average by more than three beats per minute. And their skin conductance levels—a measure of physiological arousal – were significantly increased compared to those in the non-ASMR group.
Try out a few of the most popular ASMRists (as they're known) on YouTube, like Ilse of TheWaterWhispers, Maria of GentleWhispering, or Taylor of ASMR Darling. Each of these channels covers a range of triggers and, while some videos last upwards of 30 minutes, most ASMR enthusiasts report tingling after only a few minutes of concentrating on the sounds.
The term ASMR was coined in 2010 by Jennifer Allen, a 39-year-old penetration tester. “For years I thought, ‘Jeez, maybe I have a brain tumour or something,’” she recalls. From 1999 onwards, Allen searched steadfastly for others like her online. In the late noughties, she stumbled upon a SteadyHealth.com forum in which a user named okaywhatever51838 discussed a “weird sensation” that “feels good”.

The main trigger though is being in large open areas with no one around, even seeing pictures of large open areas can trigger it. I used to work at a college that had several buildings, modern buildings, not ivy covered brick. One was not classrooms, but an area with offices and occasional banquets, so it was mainly empty and quiet. I used to sit there on breaks just to get that relaxation tingly sensation.Is this ASMR or something else?

Yes, i used to meet with a woman once a month. She would get to my desk and start talking. I felt i was in a trance, like she was affecting my brain waves. She had had a brain injury and surgery. I later met another lady who was a neighbor and she had the same effect on me. It was later discovered that she had a brain tumor. I’ve never had that experience before or since except sometimes fluorescent lights cause the same feeling.
ASMR refers to the pleasurable sensation people experience when exposed to various specific triggers, either from ASMR videos or in their everyday lives. According to a 2015 study from Swansea University in Wales—the first peer-reviewed research into ASMR—whispering is the most common trigger for ASMR, with 75% of participants experiencing ASMR sensations from it. The other most common triggers were personal attention, crisp sounds (like tapping or crunching), and slow movements, as reported by the group of 475 participants.
I work at a call center and have the opportunity to hear many different voices but none have given me any sort of ASMR response. Although I’ve always liked my own voice to a certain extent and I actually like it when the caller can’t hear me ’cause I put my hand in front of my mouth and let my tone reverb into the mike while allowing myself to hear how I sound a bit better. I never really thought of why I’ve liked my own voice until yesterday. I was giving an average sales pitch in a radio-esc tone and I felt a sense of ecstacy behind my ears mostly but also reaching from the entire back half of my head and sllightly down my neck. I don’t think it’s just the sound of my voice that triggered the response. I think it was the literal vibration within my body that created the sensation. When I come to think of it, it felt similar, yet better than how it feels when I sing and think I’m doing well. I know this sounds conceded but It’s a physical sensation ranging from good to ecstacy with my voice. It’s nothing like; I’m awesome and better than everyone else. It just feels good to speak with a deep tone.
Let’s clarify something right off the bat: medically, it is not recommended that you eat chalk. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, swallowing large quantities of chalk can cause abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, and also shortness of breath and coughing. Eating chalk should not kill you, because it’s not toxic, but it’s not safe.
Richard, who is also the author of Brain Tingles: The Secret to Triggering Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response for Improved Sleep, Stress Relief, and Head-to-Toe Euphoria, estimates around 20 per cent of the population experience strong ASMR. What triggers people may come down to individual preferences. “The key to triggering ASMR is to create gentle sounds,” he says. Richard’s own triggers include eye exams and [the Netflix series] The Joy of Painting with Bob Ross.
Payton is part of an ASMR wave that is attracting millions of viewers to videos that are intentionally designed to trigger the tingles. They feature people whispering into microphones, carving or crushing soap, and giving personal makeovers. In less than 10 years since the term was coined, oddly satisfying ASMR content has gone from a fringe concept on message boards to a global internet phenomenon.
The least sexual and most Spiritual ASMR I’ve ever had was when I was traveling in the Holy Land, and a man trained as a Jewish Cantor (http://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/what-is-a-cantor/) recited/sang a prayer in a Baha’i Temple. My entire body throbbed with the sound that poured out of that man’s soul My skin felt so tight I could have been a clothing size smaller, the tingles of deep joy coursed in whirls under my skin, my blood pounding through my veins. If you’ve ever watched videos of sand on top of speakers… it felt like that man’s voice was having that effect on my body, changing the very cell structure, just with the sound of his chanting. It was amazing. It was incredibly intense. And definitely spiritual.
I first got the tingles (as I called them) at seven years of age, I would be sitting with a friend, or alone, listening to the radio, drawing, talking, suddenly everything gets hushed, quite, talk is low, personal, close. To me, it feels like Empathy Overload! Deep feelings of shared tragedy, celebration or experience, in song, speech or shared moments of complete silence. But it’s empathy operating at a very high level, that’s what I feel. A deep understanding of the law and order of… everything,
My main trigger is watching someone concentrating silently on a mundane task (writing, drawing, ironing, cleaning, doing a puzzle) and them not being aware that I am aware of what they are doing. I also find sometimes that having a haircut can produce the same sensation. I also find that the feeling can sometimes be accentuated by gently rubbing the back of my neck with something like a pen or the end of my glasses. I haven’t yet found a video that works as a trigger – it needs to be there for real and even then doesn’t and won’t happen “on demand”.
I’ve expereienced ASMR since childhood. Listening to Bob Ross was one of the more memorable, but I would also tap my pencils and school supplies, and leaf through books to get the same sensations. When I found ASMR videos on Youtube I first learned it was called “ASMR”. I didn’t know it had a name. Since then, I’ve watched lots of ASMR videos, and I’ve reached “immunity” on some triggers – tapping doesn’t work for me as well as it used to, but it works better after taking long breaks away from it. Slient hand movements in some of the reiki/aura cleansing videos work well. The triggers that affect me most now seem to be more visual now than auditory. Massage ASMR, Free Spirit ASMR, LuneInnate and Rose Harmonics are the Youtubers I follow who do lots of hand movement triggers. I also really like Ephemeral Rift, ASMR Node, and RaphyTaphy (even if their styles tend more to tapping, which doesn’t work as well for me any more).
You feel quite literally, euphoric, but quite. A moment of deep reflection mixed with an even deeper empathic connection with the subject or sound, And as you grow up, your empahic abilities grow as well, you learn more about the world around you. You may have had a brutal upbringing, You may carry the weight of the world on your shoulders. But you see things differently, you may be gifted, no trauma at all in your life so far, touch wood. For me, it happens while practicing a shared love (graffiti/drawing, in my case) A shared activity (relationships), a menial task (work) or shared adventure (your life), there are so many triggers. I can be alone, an get light empathic feelings for others or even a different race (suffering somewhere in this world), who aren’t even there, I’ll never even meet them. Empathy doesn’t ask permission, it is permission! We are waaaay past that point now people! Spiritually, physically, mentally, we are connected.

Another unanswered question: why do some people experience ASMR while others don't? "The simplest answer is a genetic difference," says Richard. In the same way that some people dislike cilantro or have a high tolerance for alcohol, genetics could affect how sensitive someone is to the neurochemicals produced during ASMR. "The ability to experience ASMR could also be influenced by lifetime experiences, diet, medications, and many other factors," he says. "It's clear that researchers still have a lot to figure out."
I can trigger it at will, whenever I want with any kind of intensity as I please. I can concentrate the sensation in any place of my body, say tip of a single finger or my whole body. But, I want to know, is it wrong to abuse it? Or is it good? What can happen if I continue using it? By the way, I don’t need external stimuli to activate it, just the desire to do it, it’s like moving your hand.
The first time I remember ASMR I was in pre-school and a girl who was normally not nice to me was kind to me. I think she tied my shoes for me. To this day, this is the strongest trigger. My Twitter name (I am the mom over our geeky pack) is a clue to why this did not happen all the time. I was not popular though well liked in my group of uncool kids. So when the popular kids or someone I held in high regard (teacher, etc) gave me attention that was above and beyond, my whole head would tingle.
"Sounds that trigger ASMR are always low volume and are usually steady, rhythmic, and predictable," says Craig Richard, Ph.D., founder of the site ASMR University and author of Brain Tingles. "Our brains interpret sounds with these traits as non-threatening, which can induce relaxation—especially when incorporated with personal attention and caring behaviors."
If you don't like any of these, there are lots of other options. The top YouTube “ASMRtists,” like ASMR Darling and Gibi ASMR, have over a million subscribers and hundreds of videos each. You can also explore “unintentional ASMR:” content not created with tingles in mind, but that just so happens to promote them. (Painter Bob Ross has a cult ASMR following).

ASMR, or “autonomous sensory meridian response,” is the term for the sensation people get when they watch stimulating videos such as this one. Many people describe the feeling as “tingles” (or “head orgasms“) that run through the back of the head, neck, and, spine. For some, the feeling is deeply relaxing and can even cause them to fall asleep. This is definitely not something I experienced.


Let me start from my personal experience. As a schoolboy, I had a particular French teacher whose voice would put me into a trance. As soon as she started talking, it felt like my brain would start tingling. Her measured cadence and accent felt almost like some sort of mind massage. It was incredibly relaxing – and felt amazing, almost like an audio version of one of these:

The most popular stuff discussed amongst ASMR community is whispering and tapping – and I get it a bit from that – but one thing is, I know that when the person is addressing me (or the camera as it may be), that seems to dispel ASMR for me. In fact, I’d say a pre-req for me to ASMR is that I am in the role of passive observer – perhaps that speaks to my personality? I know I have introverted tendencies. That leads me to the first of my questions:
An Instagram user who runs a repost account, meaning that they do not personally create any chalk-eating videos, told Motherboard in an Instagram direct message that they believe most people who make "chalk-eating" videos do not actually eat the chalk (The user asked that Motherboard withhold their account handle because certain members of the chalk-eating ASMR community have been bullied.)

From the tongue-clicks of Janelle Monae’s ‘Make Me To Feel’ to the crunchy bite of an apple that punctuates Superorganism’s ‘Something For Your M.I.N.D’ (surely the quintessential ASMR song?), via actual Macca munching carrots on The Beach Boys’ ‘Vegetables’ and the general click-fest that is the Soulwax remix of Metronomy’s ‘Love Letters’,  step this way to ASMR nirvana.

When your hungry or when your thristy, upon drinking or eating your brain feels allot better. When consuming it your brain triggers natural dopamine activations in the brain signaling a rewarding behavior. (note that this is done on a regular basis when using alcohol or drugs, where the drug invades the brain dopamine receptors thus requiring a higher dose of whatever the person took, to get the same experience.

Can someone explain why this got rid of my migraine?? I have had a migraine for 2 days ( I get really bad chronic migraines – i have for my whole life ). I just recently discovered this ASMR thing, today actually. I watched the tapping/whispering ones and I felt these tingling sensations all over my body, mostly my head and arms, BUT holy heck my migraine is gone. I don’t understand! why?? It is a miracle if this works.

The uncharted territory isn’t what people experience, Richard says, but how (some people are triggered through their own thoughts and memories; others through external sights, sounds or touch) and why. To help find answers, Allen and Richard’s team launched its first rudimentary ASMR research survey last month. It received more than 4,000 responses within the first 10 days.


ASMR is described as a pleasurable tingling that begins in the head and scalp, shimmies down the spine and relaxes the entire body. Maria — she asked that her last name be withheld for safety reasons; her videos have sometimes attracted unwanted attention — experiences ASMR, and her YouTube channel, GentleWhispering, melds her personal tingle-triggers with others suggested by her fans. The resulting videos have drawn more than 87 million views, making Maria the premier celebrity of a controversial but increasingly recognized phenomenon.
Hi! I am not sure if I experience ASMR or not. The only thing that I know is when someone whispers, speaks (low/high notes) close/near my back I get chills/tingles/tickling sensation. But when the sound doesn’t travel straight to my back, I dont get chills. I have been searching for answers and ASMR is the only thing close to it. I hope that you guys can help me. Thanks.
I am so pleased to see posts from people pertaining to ASMR. I didn’t even know it had a name until this year. I’ve had ASMR since I can remember and when I still had it as an adult, I thought I was some kind of freak. I wouldn’t dare speak about it to anyone, even my husband. I have various triggers and for me ASMR is not sexual. The tingles don’t always happen but when they do it’s a wonderful peaceful feeling that I want to go on and on.
I get this response, but I don't always like the feeling. If someone pulls down a projector screen, like those found in classrooms, i get a tingling sensation all over my body but I don't associate it with a pleasurable feeling. It's almost like nails on a chalkboard. I feel the same way about listening to a violin. The whispering though is a pleasurable ASMR response for me.
Some ASMR video creators use binaural recording techniques to simulate the acoustics of a three-dimensional environment, reported to elicit in viewers and listeners the experience of being in close proximity to actor and vocalist.[33] Binaural recordings are usually made using two microphones, just like stereo recordings. However, in binaural recordings the two microphones tend to be more specially designed to mimic ears on humans. In many cases, microphones are separated the same distance as ears are on humans, and microphones are surrounded by ear-shaped cups to get similar reverb as human ears.
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