I can trigger it at will, whenever I want with any kind of intensity as I please. I can concentrate the sensation in any place of my body, say tip of a single finger or my whole body. But, I want to know, is it wrong to abuse it? Or is it good? What can happen if I continue using it? By the way, I don’t need external stimuli to activate it, just the desire to do it, it’s like moving your hand.

I must admit that I had never heard of Bob Ross before I discovered ASMR, and chances are that if you live outside America this will be the case for you too. Technically speaking Bob Ross is simply provides a good combination of many of the other common triggers, but because of his widespread popularity as an ASMR trigger I thought he was worth mentioning on his own. The great thing about being triggered by Bob Ross is that you can buy full length DVDs so you can quickly and easily get some ASMR going from the comfort of your couch.
I experience this occasionally. The strongest occasion was approx 12 years ago. I was in the “High Country” NE Victoria, North of a town called Mansfield. I was out hunting Sambar Deer, 10 K’s from my off sider and in open bush land. About 1 Hr prior I came across droppings from wild dogs which were prevalent in the area and a real problem for farmers. I had this sensation all over my head and down my neck, it scared me. I had the feeling someone, something was watching me and was a bit shaken. I pulled myself together and continued my hunt. Never came across any deer or anything else that day.

Anyway, I have no problem sleeping, ever. I usually have a problem getting to bed, because I fall asleep wherever I’m sitting. My big problem is being intimate. If I’m in the middle of business, and I start thinking about my girlfriend’s body touching parts of the right side of my body, I start getting severe tickles and I’ve tossed her to the side because it’s too much for me. It’s one of those things where you tell yourself not to think about it, but it makes you think about it more. My right knee is the worst part. Anyone comes near that knee, not even touching it – they could just sit next to me, and if their leg touches my knee occasionally – I get tickle fits.


The French word 'frisson' signifies a brief sensation usually reported as pleasurable and often expressed as an overwhelming emotional response to stimuli, such as a piece of music. Frisson often occurs simultaneously with piloerection, colloquially known as 'goosebumps', by which tiny muscles called arrector pili contract, causing body hair, particularly that on the limbs and back of the neck, to erect or 'stand on end'.[54][55][56][57]
<3 I heard about ASMR a few months ago, and was amazed to learn that only a certain group of people got the head tingles hehe. Whenever I was younger, I would always make my mom braid my hair or brush it, because it would always give me the best shivers. Same with getting a haircut, or going for a doctors appointment. I always assumed it was normal to have those sensations, and that everybody got them. Turns out I was wrong!
Listening to a binaural recording through headphones simulates the binaural hearing by which people listen to live sounds. For the listener, this experience is characterised by two perceptions. Firstly, the listener perceives being in close proximity to the performers and location of the sound source. Secondly, the listener perceives what is often reported as a three-dimensional sound.[33] This means the listener can perceive both the position and distance of the source of sound relative to them.
I’ve been experiencing ASMR since childhood, although Its only been about 6 months since I discovered that other people experience this same feeling. I have never really been able to “conjure” the tingles, they just come when they come. I have identified my triggers to be more of the one on one human interaction variety. Here’s my question: since discovering the ASMR community I have tried watching several different types of YouTuber’s (men, women, different styles, topics, etc.) but the videos (although they can be nice and relaxing) never make me feel the same as “the real thing.” Does anyone else find his to be the case? Have you discovered any way around it if so?
ASMR's main draws, as Richard explained, are the feelings it can create. When a person hears whispering, crinkling, tapping, or other ASMR triggers, they experience tingling sensations throughout their body. But the physical sensations aren't the only reasons people watch ASMR content. A 2017 study found that 41% of respondents watch ASMR videos to help them fall asleep, while 59% watch to relax.

"As ASMR has started to come to mainstream attention, researchers have finally begun trying to answer that question. Neuroscientists are now experimenting with fMRIs and electroencephalography to see if the brains of 'tingleheads,' as they are called, are any different than those who don’t tremble at the sight of napkin-folding. They’ve also surveyed tens of thousands of people who say they experience the phenomenon. So far there are intriguing—if limited—findings suggesting that ASMR may relieve some people’s symptoms of stress and insomnia, and that the brains of those who experience it may be organized a little differently."
ASMR's main draws, as Richard explained, are the feelings it can create. When a person hears whispering, crinkling, tapping, or other ASMR triggers, they experience tingling sensations throughout their body. But the physical sensations aren't the only reasons people watch ASMR content. A 2017 study found that 41% of respondents watch ASMR videos to help them fall asleep, while 59% watch to relax.
ASMR has been around for 10 years, mainly on YouTube, yet many hadn’t heard of it, let alone experienced it, before Sunday night’s commercial. ASMR is a feeling often experienced as a tingling sensation that starts in the head and moves down the spine. It comes through various forms of audio and visual stimuli, and is mainly used as a relaxation technique, says the YouTube personality who goes by the name Gibi ASMR.
A: I told my friends there was an ASMR commercial coming, and they thought it was funny. My friends are super supportive and tease me in a very sweet way. When it came on, they start screaming, “I’m tingling!” And everyone’s just screaming and like, “No way, this is crazy. I can’t believe this is on TV right now.” I had like 20 pairs of eyes turn and stare at me.

I would spend all Friday, Saturday drawing outlines with my 3 best friends, discussing art, colour and symmetry for hours, then spend all Saturday night bombing trains, painting together would activate it intensely, in the dark, spooky and exhilarating all at the same time, while four kids spent their weekends silently breaking the law to paint Top-to-Bottom Wholecars just for art’s sake)

In my case, I enjoy the most when it occurs naturally in a real world situation. I would suggest you to play some online response related games (color-word match etc.,) for couple of minutes daily and try 1 or 2 ASMR trigger videos at a time. I hope you will get to experience ASMR on some videos at least. Even you play response related games like the color-word match or odd - even number match or the Vowel & consonant related Yes/No kind of games found in the internet for 10 to 15 minutes, I believe you will get at least a basic feeling of ASMR when you are simply resting or when you are calm without having to induce it through videos. Hope this helps. Trust me, it is a really, really good feeling. If it still doesn't work, forget it, no hard feelings. Like I said, I experience it once in blue moon, but never crave for it although I enjoy it when it happens naturally :)

For outsiders, ASMR has always been weird. “One thing that’s interesting about the ASMR experience is that it’s about close personal attention,” says Giulia Poerio, a psychology professor at the University of Sheffield who has undertaken multiple ASMR studies. Role-play videos thrive in the ASMR community – online, you can watch someone pretend to be your dentist, masseuse, or even a receptionist checking you into a hotel. “They’re basically a simulation of what would happen if you got ASMR in real life,” Poerio explains. “Multiple triggers are layered to get an effect.”
I first got the tingles (as I called them) at seven years of age, I would be sitting with a friend, or alone, listening to the radio, drawing, talking, suddenly everything gets hushed, quite, talk is low, personal, close. To me, it feels like Empathy Overload! Deep feelings of shared tragedy, celebration or experience, in song, speech or shared moments of complete silence. But it’s empathy operating at a very high level, that’s what I feel. A deep understanding of the law and order of… everything,
For me it’s tapping, whispering (the closer the better), hair brushing (directly on the mic, not just raking a brush through hair), and hypnosis (even if they’re only attempts or roleplay). Medical or other kinds of roleplay don’t seem to affect me at all and just come off as phony in my mind. It’s the sounds themselves, and their intensity at very close range, that hit me hardest. I don’t really care what’s being said. In fact I get just as much out of asmr in languages I don’t understand. Pretty sure French in and of itself is something of a trigger.
I get this response, but I don't always like the feeling. If someone pulls down a projector screen, like those found in classrooms, i get a tingling sensation all over my body but I don't associate it with a pleasurable feeling. It's almost like nails on a chalkboard. I feel the same way about listening to a violin. The whispering though is a pleasurable ASMR response for me.

Pretty cool… I actually teach something very similar in one of my addiction recovery books; Step 2 “The Next Level …” @ http://www.therealmofdouglas.com basically I show people how to call forth VERY strong emotions in my 5 Step Programming technique (belief modification technique A.K.A. self hypnosis), I can do it at will 24/7 with a very pronounced effect every time. One second at the drop of a dime every time. Interesting to see people experimenting with something very similar… I teach people about will power and how to become a functional personality type instead of an abusive personality type, while they quit using/abusing substances and learn a heck of a lot along the way. But yes in the time it takes to watch this video I could have created literally over 200 emotional responses covering my entire body head to toe with a very pronounced effect each time. It can best be described as a tingling sensation. I am however new to these ASMR videos, but yah very similar stuff. Great video.
According to YouTube estimates, there are more than 45 million ASMR videos uploaded to the site, and, over the past year, there has been a marked increase in children making ASMR-related videos. Richard hypothesises that our brain is probably more receptive to an unknown child than a strange adult, making it easier for some individuals to be relaxed by ASMR videos featuring children.
‘Attention Induced Head Orgasm’ was the first recorded name for this experience and can be found when searching for ASMR origins. I believe (unfortunately) theres always going to be a sexual association. Also, the fact our body is flooded with endorphins also gives those who either a) lack in knowledge and b) the media a reason to think ASMR has such a strong sexual link.
Not everyone is fortunate enough to experience the tingling though. It’s like meditation — for some it works and for others it doesn’t, but the soft-spoken videos can help calm the anxious parts of the brain. Finding your own personal trigger could also help. Some common triggers are whispering, scratching and tapping, blowing, pages turning, concentration on a task, touching the head and Bob Ross.
I can trigger it at will, whenever I want with any kind of intensity as I please. I can concentrate the sensation in any place of my body, say tip of a single finger or my whole body. But, I want to know, is it wrong to abuse it? Or is it good? What can happen if I continue using it? By the way, I don’t need external stimuli to activate it, just the desire to do it, it’s like moving your hand.
I’m totally with you in similarity on that. I can get it from reading or watching something profound, and also being engaged in a deep connection with someone. I believe ASMR is the main reason why I used to believe in, and what I used to describe as, my third eye. Like Carlos Cruz, I also get the sensation from music, actually having been utterly attached my whole life to gaining these feelings from listening to music.
This is really interesting. I didn't get any tingling from any of theses videos and there were a few videos on YouTube that said they would trigger the sensation too but nothing, although, most of them were extremely annoying and irritating like the whispering ones, they were not pleasant at all :( . I was looking for the reason I get a full body tingling when I hear certain singing voices. Its like a flushing from my feet to my head of tiny bubbles at least I know it isnt called ASMR I looked into Frisson also and it isn't that either..... the search continues.

There are certain “chillout” music tracks that trigger a pleasant ASMR sensation for me if I listen through headphones. They are likely to be more effective than watching someone folding a towel. One of them is “Summer Love” by Paul Hardcastle. There are some pulsating notes right at the beginning which seem to massage the brain & scalp; and the female singers have a soft gentle sound in their choruses and harmonies. Also try “Deep River” by Lemongrass featuring the Russian keyboard player / vocalist Jane Maximova. It has long notes which undulate warmly, invoking inner visions of beaches and ocean waves. Over these warm sounds, Jane whispers a poem from the point of view a woman who sees herself as a “deep river” for her lover. Her mermaid-like singing and whispers, along with her exotic accent, will surely trigger ASMR, or send you gently to sleep.
I have never heard of ASMR or its triggers, but having just read the article – all I can say is THANK YOU! I have wondered for years why certain things like just silently “humming” the tune of song inside my head induces a full body reaction (goosebumps), or as the author mentioned, someone brushing my hair, or lightly running fingertips over my skin – my arms especially – induces goosebumps. It is such a pleasant soothing feeling but I never knew why. I’ve spent my adult life thinking I was “weird” but I guess I”m not. The soothing arm rubbing I’ve experienced since a child – I used to pay my younger siblings to rub my arms for me..= ). I will definitely read up more on this.
Thanks for your comments Elysium. I used the term orgasmatron simply because this is the name by which I’ve always known those massagers. I didn’t make up the word, i believe it was a brand name that they were originally available under, perhaps that was just in Australia. But I understand your point. I’m planning a page outlining this issue, so I’ll be sure to include that link and clarify the text when that is ready.
She has invested in her craft, upgrading to top-notch binaural microphones that carry every exhale into a listener’s ears as if Maria is standing beside them. Her videos, like most ASMR recordings, are undeniably intimate. But the intended response — although often described as “brain orgasms” — is not sexual, ASMR enthusiasts insist. (Unsurprisingly, a few of the creepier online comments insist otherwise.)
I was researching triggering ASMR/frisson and someone said (http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=428.170;wap2) that controlling goosebumps, which may or may not be what I can do, actually feeds off your muscles or something… I haven’t been able to back this up though I’ve tried, but what’s your opinion on it? (I’m weak enough without atrophying my muscles inducing frissons XD)
While most girls her age earned their pocket money babysitting the neighbours’ kids, Kelly spent that summer in her bedroom filming 50 custom-made ASMR videos. She would receive daily email requests for bespoke videos, shoot the footage, receive the money over PayPal (ten minutes cost $50, whereas for $30 (about £23) you’d get a five-minute clip) and upload the video to her YouTube channel, Life with Mak.
I don’t know if I have the asmr described here, but I find myself getting something like ‘warm chills’ along my back and head. They often happen when I relax myself or feel apprehensive. Examples are; during wreck it Ralph when Ralph was falling towards the mentos on coke bottle mountain. I was getting Butt tons of these. Or maybe when I am sort of tense and its a cold day, I move around a little and feel some tingles. I get these tingles whenever I expect something sort of intense to happen; explosions, a crushing impact, the defeat of a character I love. But only when I expect it, never during.
ASMR has been around for 10 years, mainly on YouTube, yet many hadn’t heard of it, let alone experienced it, before Sunday night’s commercial. ASMR is a feeling often experienced as a tingling sensation that starts in the head and moves down the spine. It comes through various forms of audio and visual stimuli, and is mainly used as a relaxation technique, says the YouTube personality who goes by the name Gibi ASMR.

These reports have precipitated comparison between ASMR and synesthesia – a condition characterised by the excitation of one sensory modality by stimuli that normally exclusively stimulates another, as when the hearing of a specific sound induces the visualization of a distinct color, a type of synesthesia called chromesthesia. Thereby, people with other types of synesthesia report for example 'seeing sounds' in the case of auditory-visual synesthesia, or 'tasting words' in the case of lexical-gustatory synesthesia.[42][43][44][45][46]

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