I experience both asmr and frisson so I am familiar with both. They are similar in that they both cause a tingling sensation. Asmr is triggered mainly by physical senses (sight, sound, sometimes smell) and produces a relaxing effect. Like you literally can fall asleep from it. Frisson is triggered by thought and emotion and produces an exciting effect.
It’s been described as a “brain massage”, and people all over the world watch similar videos – usually someone seeming to give you their undivided attention – to de-stress or drift off to sleep of an evening. Experts explain that it’s about feelings of intimacy and empathy. If you think this sounds like a weird sex thing – no, as it happens, this isn’t a weird sex thing, though the phenomena has been nicknamed a “brain orgasm”. In 2015, a study found that 98 percent of ASMR-loving respondents use the videos to simply relax, while for 70 percent it was stress relief. Only 5 percent said it’s about sexual stimulation (for those people, may we recommend the very whispery ‘Je T’aime Moi Non Plus’ from Jane Birkin and Serge Gainboroug…). There are plenty of songs, too, with evocative sounds – brittle beats, tongue clicks and more – that’ll appeal to those who experience ASMR.

Question: I am new to ASMR and have yet to find any triggers that cause me to have the ‘tingles.’ (I have experienced the ‘tingles’ in real life situations, so I know what the sensation is, I just can’t remember what triggered them!) I have heard that ASMR videos are more effective with headphones. When people say this, do they mean *any* type of personal listening device (such as ear buds, like I am using) or do they mean a set of actual, over-the-ear headphones? Could the use of ear buds be contributing to my difficulty finding my trigger?


I have always had a little AMSR throughout my life. However, I have been meditation for about a year and the AMSR has kicked in big time over the last month. I didn’t know what it was and everyone I talked to about my experiences couldn’t relate – and a few thought I had lost it Eventually the web came through for me and I have a name for my experiences.

I can trigger my ASMR at any time and it helps me gather my thoughts and calm down easily. It is weird to do, I have just recently found out about it and I was really strange knowing that not everyone could just do it anytime, sometimes or not at all so this is so strange before I found this out I thought I was just giving my self goosebumps just without the bumps so those are my feelings I just had to get out of my system.
While I will admit that ASMR (and sleep) is definitely the kind of thing that admits of “more” and “less” descriptors, I’m still not convinced that it is “intensity” that is the proper target of the “more” and “less” (btw, do you see what I mean? “intense” by itself isn’t a term of comparison. You need to introduce “more” and “less” for this… but more and less what?). However, I’ll also admit that I’m at a loss to suggest a better term. Maybe this is the kind of thing that merits it’s own category, and eventually we’ll just say that something is more or less ASMR… doesn’t quite have the same ring to it though…

<3 I heard about ASMR a few months ago, and was amazed to learn that only a certain group of people got the head tingles hehe. Whenever I was younger, I would always make my mom braid my hair or brush it, because it would always give me the best shivers. Same with getting a haircut, or going for a doctors appointment. I always assumed it was normal to have those sensations, and that everybody got them. Turns out I was wrong!
If you have trouble sleeping or just need to relax, put on your best headphones and enjoy the binaural sounds of these special brushes! This type of sound when used with headphones promotes relaxation/sleep and can trigger ASMR (Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response) in some people which is a pleasurable tingling feeling in the head/neck area. Try it for yourself!

Bob Ross ALWAYS triggers this response (I have 15+ Joy of Painting episodes saved on my DVR right now). While all the other videos triggered my ASMR somewhat, the Rushka tea one had the most effect. I also like to watch people doing crafts (the sound of scissors cutting construction paper is amazing). Getting a massage or just watching someone get a massage (I can even read the description of spa treatments & have an ASMR response!) I love my hair to be played with too! As you probably know, the list can go on forever!!
Daniel and Prunkl keep a folder full of this man’s transgressions and have notified the local police. “Sometimes it scares me,” Daniel confesses, quieter now. “It does scare me that this guy could be anywhere.” Similarly, Makenna Kelly fears that kids at her bus stop will follow her home and leak her address online. “I just go down to the clubhouse and wait ten minutes just to make sure nobody knows where I live.”
Interesting… wait… is… a type of ASMR when you get goosebumps and it feels amazing- it’s one of the best feelings I know- to have someone rub their fingers or drag them lightly across your armor the back of your neck? Because ever since I was a child I have loved that feeling (I always annoyed my mother getting her to do it XD) and I sometimes do it to myself, which doesn’t work as well because it’s me doing it, but still feels good.
"Seven years later, ASMR is having a pop culture moment—even if many of those who use it don’t know what the acronym stands for. The phenomenon’s most popular practitioners have more than half a million subscribers, and the doyenne of ASMRrtists, Maria of Gentle Whispering ASMR, has been so successful that she’s been able to quit her job to role-play soothing cosmetologists, librarians and flight attendants full-time. But what is ASMR? What function does it serve, who is drawn to it, and why? Or, as researcher Craig Richard puts it: 'Why are millions of people watching someone fold a napkin?'

I just recently learned of ASMR even though I’ve been experiencing the sensation my whole life. What I find so funny is how many ASMR fans and artists love Bob Ross. My family always joked at how much I loved watching Bob Ross growing up and I was never able to fully describe to them the sensations I was feeling. I used to seek out sounds that gave me the ASMR sensations and discovered there were many of them.

I can… sort of do this… I can (and I’m borrowing a bit the words of someone above in the comments who’s much better at description than I) send a wave of tingles or energy, I guess, down my spine and my legs a little. It sometimes makes my muscles twitch involuntarily and it feels good… I can’t do it in my head, it starts in my shoulders and sides, I don’t get goosebumps (but then the strongest feeling is in my lower back) and can’t do it in my arms, but it feels like tingles. I haven’t tried seeing if anyone else can feel it (weird that that works… is it like… static electricity or something? Come to think of it, it does feel sort of like electricity…) but I will, though as I can’t spread it to my hands I doubt it will work.
Listening to a binaural recording through headphones simulates the binaural hearing by which people listen to live sounds. For the listener, this experience is characterised by two perceptions. Firstly, the listener perceives being in close proximity to the performers and location of the sound source. Secondly, the listener perceives what is often reported as a three-dimensional sound.[33] This means the listener can perceive both the position and distance of the source of sound relative to them.
Coming onto this page, I was hoping for a few good videos to bring on the shivers, but unfortunately, Ol' Bob Ross was the only successful one. I did enjoy that fountain pen and the tea making video though. Made me kinda drowsy aha. I don't know about you, but my ultimate asmr triggers, are soft spoken role-plays, especially when the person has an accent. Videos of head massages are also fantastic whenever I want some tingles :) You should check some of them out.
I had an abnormal psychology professor in undergrad that would have me drooling by the end of class because her voice was so “soothing”. Lately, I have found that instructional videos via Youtube do the trick. I’m embarrassed to say, but I watched a video of some random guy giving a tutorial on how to properly clean out your ear for roughly a year (lol). I can watch nearly anything instructional to induce the sensation, but I am drawn to videos in which the narrator has an accent.
Sleep and Relax ASMR is a weekly podcast that creates audio experiences designed to help people sleep and relax. The show uses various ASMR triggers including whispers, gentle speaking, relaxing background noise, and general ambiance to help people unwind and relax from their busy lives. Our goal is to create the best ASMR content possible. Whether you enjoy the sound of soothing waves, snow crunching on a mountain, a soft spoken ramble, or whispered storytelling, Sleep and Relax ASMR has your ASMR needs covered. Check out Sleep and Relax ASMR and Friends for more ASMR content. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sleepandrelaxasmr/support.Read more »
Looking for someone who can control these and not need videos or sounds, anyone out there? I’ve mastered this and pushed beyond to send the goosebumps to parts of my body at will. Also tested with sending the goosebumps into another person, which oddly enough they felt. I was able to keep my hand 1 inch away from this person, had the person look the opposite way, and push thing energy into them asking them when they felt it, they were able to tell me the exact times i did.

It’s been described as a “brain massage”, and people all over the world watch similar videos – usually someone seeming to give you their undivided attention – to de-stress or drift off to sleep of an evening. Experts explain that it’s about feelings of intimacy and empathy. If you think this sounds like a weird sex thing – no, as it happens, this isn’t a weird sex thing, though the phenomena has been nicknamed a “brain orgasm”. In 2015, a study found that 98 percent of ASMR-loving respondents use the videos to simply relax, while for 70 percent it was stress relief. Only 5 percent said it’s about sexual stimulation (for those people, may we recommend the very whispery ‘Je T’aime Moi Non Plus’ from Jane Birkin and Serge Gainboroug…). There are plenty of songs, too, with evocative sounds – brittle beats, tongue clicks and more – that’ll appeal to those who experience ASMR.
Some ASMR video creators use binaural recording techniques to simulate the acoustics of a three-dimensional environment, reported to elicit in viewers and listeners the experience of being in close proximity to actor and vocalist.[33] Binaural recordings are usually made using two microphones, just like stereo recordings. However, in binaural recordings the two microphones tend to be more specially designed to mimic ears on humans. In many cases, microphones are separated the same distance as ears are on humans, and microphones are surrounded by ear-shaped cups to get similar reverb as human ears.
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