And just last month, Richard and colleagues published data that shows results of fMRI brain imaging scans for 10 individuals (who all previously reported experiencing ASMR) as they watched an ASMR video and reported feeling the sensation. The parts of the brain active when we’re socially engaged with others, when we feel empathy, and when our brain’s reward centers are on, appeared to be active when people said they experienced ASMR.
Okay, I’ll look those up. Thank you! Unfortunately, I don’t have many opportunities to experience ASMR in real life because I am house-bound from chronic illness, and am restricted to bed rest at the moment. I don’t have any friends here in town- one friend lives in Australia, another lives in Germany, and the last one lives on the other side of the state from me- and most of my real-life triggers are centered around other people. I will definitely give those videos a try! Even without the tingles, most ASMR videos are so relaxing to me that they actually calm me down, even when I am in a ton of pain! And trust me when I say that that is no small feat!
Coming onto this page, I was hoping for a few good videos to bring on the shivers, but unfortunately, Ol' Bob Ross was the only successful one. I did enjoy that fountain pen and the tea making video though. Made me kinda drowsy aha. I don't know about you, but my ultimate asmr triggers, are soft spoken role-plays, especially when the person has an accent. Videos of head massages are also fantastic whenever I want some tingles :) You should check some of them out.

The ASMR community has grown online by the hundreds of thousands over the years so far worldwide and shows no sign of slowing down. As the culture of self awareness, mindfulness and complimentary therapies grow, ASMR is becoming very useful for so many. ASMR content on YouTube is becoming a genre all of its own and strong bonds are being formed between people all over the world. Watch this space for there will undoubtably be much more to come!
The only way someone can feel what we here, obviously feel, that isn’t inflicted with ASMR. Is to go out with friends, to your favourite club, drop pure MDMA, and wait….I’ll see you on the dance floor. I’ll be the six foot seven Infantry Soldier, waiting for you to come dancing, I’ll be dancing with the biggest smile on my face, for you, dancing with friends, lovers, strangers, until we’re all fucking annihilated, lying on the dance floor, in one mind, one moment, one achievement, shared and experienced together, forever and ever and ever. Then we go home, have a shower, lie down, and feel refreshed, and wonderfully happy, exhilarated just to exist, Lying there, that very moment, is what ASMR feels like. That beautiful feeling of peaceful serenity and contentment, just to be alive and kicking, together, connected, forever. That chemically induced empathic euphoria, is the only feeling that comes close to what ASMR feels like.

There's a natural flow, an underlying world current, and you can by various practices connect with that flow, then even though not everything will turn out perfect, the important events will line up for you. It's about expansion, not concentration or focus, but relaxation and encompassing more, without suffocating anyone with your current superstitions and beliefs (they will change also).
Never heard of ASMR before stumbling on these videos on Prime. They sure seemed weird after I took a few quick looks. So... I looked up ASMR. Not much scientific research on it. Hardly any interest showing. But among the people whom it works for, the interest is huge. Apparently, large e-communities sprang up in a grass roots fashion. There are even genres and sub- genres, from what I can tell from looking into it over the last week. The guy in this video is one of the creative people exploring these positive effects that can be brought out in some people. I was surprised as hell that this video was pleasant and relaxing to me. No "tingles" for me but much relaxation. Apparently different people react to different sounds, visuals, rhythms, etc. I commend this guy and others for exploring this new-to-me aspect of at least some of us humans. If this sounds interesting to you, look into the efforts of this guy and others. Maybe you will be surprised, as I was, to find value in some of their works. Cheers! And use headphones or at least ear buds, not speakers.
wow. I never knew what that feeling was called until now. I’ve kept it to myself all of these years because I was never sure how to talk about it. I discovered mine in kindergarten when a girl traced her finger along a page. I can experience ASMR pretty much whenever I want now. for me, it’s a combination of sound and motion. for some reason, an Indian accent triggers it very easily. it’s an amazing feeling. I’m curious, does anyone know if there are any health pros or cons with ASMR? have any studies been done?
In addition to the information collected from the 475 subjects who participated in the scientific investigation conducted by Nick Davies and Emma Barratt,[4] there have been two attempts to collate statistical data pertaining to the demographics, personal history, clinical conditions, and subjective experience of those who report susceptibility to ASMR.

I'm with Lg. I ran across these articles of ASMR. 100% would first warn a smacking fool eating before smacking the food out of their mouth and smashing their plate on the floor. I don't have a clue why anyone finds these things " enjoyable ", at all. They are all beyond irritating . So I assume I don't have any response to ASMR other than irritating me. Such as some fool scratching a chalk board. Which also would want to smash a chair upside their head as well. As for starting fires ect. Only thing I can assume is that maybe I understand why other people want to sit and observer while I perform those tasks, or fix things. That's all I can take from this. Others find pleasure watching me, because they sure don't offer physical help to complete the tasks. I just don't get it at all.
Hey, my name is Topaz and i have a question about my ASMR. I’ve been looking at youtube videos wondering what asmr was and trying to figure out if i have it aswell, then i thought about it. When ever some one slides the tip of their fingers through my hair and slowly pulls on the strands of my hair (not pulling it out) i get that tingly sensation on my head and on my neck for me to shrug my shoulder, I was wondering is that’s an asmr? Also,I like when some one or myself lightly slides their fingers on my arm, as well as the lower half of my back and on the sides of my neck just below the ear. Is that a sign of asmr? I tried to be specific as possible, please respond back and help me, Thank you c:
I had to look up ASMR because it kept popping up in YouTube every now and again. I think I may have the opposite reaction to these sounds. I find almost all of them unpleasant to some degree, most notably the whispering because I can usually hear a persons saliva moving around in their mouth when they are talking. People are so interesting! I don’t mean to criticize anyone, just to say that we are all so unique. I find this interesting, but I just can’t relate. Thanks for the info though.
Coming onto this page, I was hoping for a few good videos to bring on the shivers, but unfortunately, Ol' Bob Ross was the only successful one. I did enjoy that fountain pen and the tea making video though. Made me kinda drowsy aha. I don't know about you, but my ultimate asmr triggers, are soft spoken role-plays, especially when the person has an accent. Videos of head massages are also fantastic whenever I want some tingles :) You should check some of them out.
You can kind of understand why. To people who don't experience ASMR, the videos can rightly look completely ridiculous. Also, because a sense of intimacy can be a very powerful trigger, it's no surprise that some of the best artists are very attractive girls, and there's clearly some personal security risks when you're putting your face out there and developing strange online relationships with people who might start to rely on a false sense of intimate connection with you.

There are two ways that people can experience ASMR. You can experience it through simple meditation or just thinking about a scene or sound that pleases you. Or you can experience it through watching a video or listening to a recording. As for the mechanisms at work behind ASMR, nobody is quite sure why some people react the way that they do. It could be that the videos remind you of your childhood (perhaps, for example, you watched your mom do the same action as a kid, so it’s comforting) or that the simple sounds lull you into a relaxed state. Ready to give ASMR a try? Find some videos on the YouTube channel for GentleWhispering, ASMR University, and ASMRlab.

I used to think it was something religious then it was triggered by non religious music. I think mine is tied to ideas that seem to be deep and profound to me. When I really feel my place as one human among billions that is hurling through space on a small rock that is spinning around a constant nuclear fusion explosion. Connection to Humanity and Beauty.


I am 69 female and have gotten a tingling in scalp in certain situations since I was a child. Just love it although it doesn't happen as often as when I was younger. Unfortunately, none of the videos did it for me and I don't ever remember seeing any youtube, etc that did it. Has to be real life. Someone comes to vacuum my office once a week. I get the tinglin feeling every time she's there. Of course, someone combing or styling my hair does it (more likely to happen if it's random and informal vs a haircut at the salon). Or someone giving me instructions and showing me how to do something (a simple, physical task) will trigger it. I try to hold onto it but it is so often too fleeting a sensation.

I used to think it was something religious then it was triggered by non religious music. I think mine is tied to ideas that seem to be deep and profound to me. When I really feel my place as one human among billions that is hurling through space on a small rock that is spinning around a constant nuclear fusion explosion. Connection to Humanity and Beauty.
Can ASMR be triggered by a completely internal stimulus? I get this tingling in my scalp and cheeks, then like a wave of warm fuzzy that washes through my body. It sounds very similar to what ASMR is described as, but it happens to me when I daydream about certain things. It happened to me more as a child than as an adult, in fact it has probably been several years since I had an experience until today, which led to me googling it. My trigger is visualizing/ daydreaming about somewhat exciting things gone perfect, a perfect lap on the motocross track, flying high G maneuvers, and most recently navigating my sailboat through some rough waters. I hate to admit to this because I don’t want to sound egotistical, but it doesn’t seem to be the subject of the daydream that brings about the ASMR like experience, but the thought of someone giving me recognition for my accomplishment that actually triggers it. Also, once I’ve had a response from a daydream about a particular experience, I can’t simply revisit the same daydream and have it trigger another experience. I’m 40, and have always experienced this, but I never knew how to explain it or if it were normal or not, so I’ve never even tried talking about this before.

I get it when I think really inspiring thoughts. And it’ll be a huuuuuge burst if it has anything to do with a metaphysical realization. Mostly I just get it with music, through inspiring lyrics, or cultural sounds. I feel that ASMR helps re-wire the neurons in your brain to let go of negative associations. Like a roadblock of realization just got pulled away, and your perception on something shifts; thanks Ganesha. I believe your mind does it to stimulate more empathy, and it’s the result of ideas connecting.


Because ASMR is such an individualistic experience, different triggers affect some people more than others. Not everyone experiences ASMR to the same intensity and the effects can differ from person to person. However, ASMR is most commonly described as a pleasurable "tingling" sensation that begins in your scalp and creeps its way down your neck and your back, sometimes spreading out to the limbs. Others describe it as "goosebumps on the brain" and "warm chills," a shivering feeling you might get if someone was gently tracing their finger down your spine. Some say it's like the pins and needles sensation when your foot falls asleep, but pleasurable instead of painful. These tingles are always accompanied by an overwhelming feeling of peaceful relaxation and euphoria; many people report feeling their anxiety slip away, and they often fall asleep afterword.
Yang Haiying is a soft-spoken Asian woman with thousands of videos uploaded to her Youtube account. The videos cover a whole bunch of topics ranging from painting to cooking to the making of tea. I’ve only seen her tea-related videos, but she has the kind of voice that will shiver you right up—and she knows it, too. Some of her videos are titled and tagged as “Inadvertent ASMR,” so she definitely knows the power of her sweet voice.
My sensations occur randomly and normally while I am sitting at the computer browsing the net, reading email, or playing my favorite games. I have not noticed a specific trigger and therefore have become concerned that it might be symptomatic of an underlying medical disorder… pending heart attack, diabetic neuropathy or a sinus irritation. I finally chose the correct key words to get Google to lead me here. I just downloaded the book so haven’t read it yet.
Hi! I am not sure if I experience ASMR or not. The only thing that I know is when someone whispers, speaks or make sounds (low/high pitch or notes) close/near my back I get chills/tingles/tickling sensation. But when the sound doesn’t travel straight to my back, I dont get chills. I have been searching for answers and ASMR is the only thing close to it. I hope that you guys can help me. Thanks.
You can kind of understand why. To people who don't experience ASMR, the videos can rightly look completely ridiculous. Also, because a sense of intimacy can be a very powerful trigger, it's no surprise that some of the best artists are very attractive girls, and there's clearly some personal security risks when you're putting your face out there and developing strange online relationships with people who might start to rely on a false sense of intimate connection with you.
Some ASMR video creators use binaural recording techniques to simulate the acoustics of a three-dimensional environment, reported to elicit in viewers and listeners the experience of being in close proximity to actor and vocalist.[33] Binaural recordings are usually made using two microphones, just like stereo recordings. However, in binaural recordings the two microphones tend to be more specially designed to mimic ears on humans. In many cases, microphones are separated the same distance as ears are on humans, and microphones are surrounded by ear-shaped cups to get similar reverb as human ears.
×