I’ve expereienced ASMR since childhood. Listening to Bob Ross was one of the more memorable, but I would also tap my pencils and school supplies, and leaf through books to get the same sensations. When I found ASMR videos on Youtube I first learned it was called “ASMR”. I didn’t know it had a name. Since then, I’ve watched lots of ASMR videos, and I’ve reached “immunity” on some triggers – tapping doesn’t work for me as well as it used to, but it works better after taking long breaks away from it. Slient hand movements in some of the reiki/aura cleansing videos work well. The triggers that affect me most now seem to be more visual now than auditory. Massage ASMR, Free Spirit ASMR, LuneInnate and Rose Harmonics are the Youtubers I follow who do lots of hand movement triggers. I also really like Ephemeral Rift, ASMR Node, and RaphyTaphy (even if their styles tend more to tapping, which doesn’t work as well for me any more).
Oh! Everything you said resonates for me, Pet Richoria! I have specific songs that tingle me all to pieces, and these have always been my special favorites, which I would play again and again, and share with others, in hopes that they would experience something similar. Some are Pink Floyd’s “Echoes,” Led Zeppelin’s “Achilles’ Last Stand,” Radiohead’s “Subterranean Homesick Alien,” Tool’s “Jimmy,” St. Vincent’s “The Bed,” Beck’s “Lonesome Tears,’ and The Morning Benders’ ” Pleasure Sighs.” There are many, many more, though!
The sounds most people like for ASMR vides are like my personal Misphonia trigger, but there’s lots of nice sounds that make my brain tingle. Wind chimes, seagulls, ocean waves, crickets, sawing wood, dry toothbrushing (no paste or water), rain, rivers, bubble wrap popping, sand moving, sharp object moving slowly on cardboard, flipping the pages of a thick book with thin pages, osculating fans, blinds being drawn, a can of soda being opened, extremely loud hardstyle techno music, purring cats, meowing, the stapler & staple remover, tea kettle just as it starts to boil, the coffee maker, fire, strong wind rustling through trees or fall leaves when you kick your way through them, vocoders, guitar riffs, chiptunes, pan frying, the sound a gas stove makes when you turn it on, pool splashing.
I am intrigued by how vast the ASMR community seems to be. I have strange tingling sensations on the top of my head, so I typed this in to google and ASMR info appeared. On all the different sites and notice boards etc. I have not seen a description however that matches my trigger so I think I might be experiencing something slightly different. My sensations are triggered by people next to me sleeping and beginning to dream. I get the tingle and then become aware that the person is twitching the way people do when they dream. It has happened to me with my boyfriend a lot, my sister once when we had to share a bed. It also happened with a complete stranger next to me on a plane and even once with my cat when he was dreaming. It’s not an unpleasant sensation but I wouldn’t say it was the ecstatic sensory experience that others have described. It has also happened in a more everyday waking experience way, when I worked with a young man with autism who was verbalising in a way that wasn’t clear communicative speech but rather jumbly kind of talk. I am interested if anyone else has had a similar experience to this. Thanks

If you want to find out more about ASMR Videos or how to find them check out the ASMR Videos page. Often the most successful ASMR videos will include a variety of triggers, and sometimes that combination can produce much more of an effect than the isolated triggers themselves, for some good examples of this check out our round-up of cranial nerve exam videos.
Sounds work ok, but I have always got the most (for lack of better word) intense asmr from touch. They don’t even have to touch me. When I was in 4-5 grade I would get it when someone I dont know well touched something close to me like my favorite stuffed animal or the eraser I use every day at school. Now I can just get lightly touched on the face and it will happen. I can just think about it and get it now.
Not everyone is fortunate enough to experience the tingling though. It’s like meditation — for some it works and for others it doesn’t, but the soft-spoken videos can help calm the anxious parts of the brain. Finding your own personal trigger could also help. Some common triggers are whispering, scratching and tapping, blowing, pages turning, concentration on a task, touching the head and Bob Ross.
Coming onto this page, I was hoping for a few good videos to bring on the shivers, but unfortunately, Ol' Bob Ross was the only successful one. I did enjoy that fountain pen and the tea making video though. Made me kinda drowsy aha. I don't know about you, but my ultimate asmr triggers, are soft spoken role-plays, especially when the person has an accent. Videos of head massages are also fantastic whenever I want some tingles :) You should check some of them out.
Aside from the pleasurable sensation that ASMR offers there are a range of other benefits. Many intentional ASMR videos are essentially forms of guided meditations, meditating regularly has been shown to reduce stress levels and aid concentration among many other things. For a lot of people ASMR is a gateway to developing an ongoing meditative practice. 

While I will admit that ASMR (and sleep) is definitely the kind of thing that admits of “more” and “less” descriptors, I’m still not convinced that it is “intensity” that is the proper target of the “more” and “less” (btw, do you see what I mean? “intense” by itself isn’t a term of comparison. You need to introduce “more” and “less” for this… but more and less what?). However, I’ll also admit that I’m at a loss to suggest a better term. Maybe this is the kind of thing that merits it’s own category, and eventually we’ll just say that something is more or less ASMR… doesn’t quite have the same ring to it though…


Can someone explain why this got rid of my migraine?? I have had a migraine for 2 days ( I get really bad chronic migraines – i have for my whole life ). I just recently discovered this ASMR thing, today actually. I watched the tapping/whispering ones and I felt these tingling sensations all over my body, mostly my head and arms, BUT holy heck my migraine is gone. I don’t understand! why?? It is a miracle if this works.
It also might be the case that you need an in-person physical trigger to experience ASMR rather than being able to feel it after watching a Youtube clip, Richard adds. Have someone play with your hair, touch your arm lightly, draw letters on your back with their fingers or whisper to you. “ASMR is ultimately about that personal connection,” Richard says.
The first time I remember ASMR I was in pre-school and a girl who was normally not nice to me was kind to me. I think she tied my shoes for me. To this day, this is the strongest trigger. My Twitter name (I am the mom over our geeky pack) is a clue to why this did not happen all the time. I was not popular though well liked in my group of uncool kids. So when the popular kids or someone I held in high regard (teacher, etc) gave me attention that was above and beyond, my whole head would tingle.

I would spend all Friday, Saturday drawing outlines with my 3 best friends, discussing art, colour and symmetry for hours, then spend all Saturday night bombing trains, painting together would activate it intensely, in the dark, spooky and exhilarating all at the same time, while four kids spent their weekends silently breaking the law to paint Top-to-Bottom Wholecars just for art’s sake)


What if you don’t NEED any triggers? I have been experiencing ASMR just by will since second grade. I can have it whenever I want it, hot or freezing weather, standing, sitting, running, resting, busy, doesn’t matter. I can just do it over and over and over again with very little meditating involved or sometimes even none, just need to focus and BOOM, the brain wave goes throughout my body and the tingling and such. I can even touch some people and they get that weird wonderful sense but very limited. Just recently I can get all my fingers to have tingling feelings (before was just back of my palm, but it’s advancing, but I’m a bit worried if this is good or bad for health..)… Anybody like me at all? I feel so alone in this world for decades… and my friends just think I’m weird and creepy when I perform it (always have goosebumps)


I have a lot of the “normal” ASMR triggers, but I also get HUGE tingles from the sound of people running a circular saw, band saw or arc welder. Does anybody else get “head-numbies” from machinery — if so, have you found a source for good triggering? The best I have been able to find are PBS shows like New Yankee Workshop or old episodes of This Old House. I have spliced together different “machine” audio files to create longer trigger files, but they never seem to work as well as those files that are created by someone else.
Because this phenomenon was only recently given a name, the science backing it up is virtually nonexistent. Of the minimal research, one study published in PeerJ found that ASMR results in “temporary improvements in symptoms of depression and chronic pain,” while another study published in the International Journal of School & Educational Psychology determined that the phenomenon can soothe stress and help insomniacs. Basically, ASMR makes people happy and healthy.

I keep randomly getting this weird sensation that feels warm and kind of tingly but I can’t tell because it happens randomly and last for a very short time but if I relax my body it comes to my face and spreads every we’re else and lasts a little longer for some reason its not strong enough to make me sleepy or relaxed for to long unfortunitly. I don’t know what this feeling is and most triggers might not work for me because I may not have asmr but I’ve never had this feeling at all before until recently.
A: I thought it was awesome. They hit the nail on the head. You can tell they did their research: They had the binaural microphones, had her whispering back and forth. They had tapping, nice sounds. They definitely watched content and had done their research on what ASMR is supposed to be. They, of course, blew it up, made it Hollywood, used a big budget, and so it was very cool. They were accurate.
I am 69 female and have gotten a tingling in scalp in certain situations since I was a child. Just love it although it doesn't happen as often as when I was younger. Unfortunately, none of the videos did it for me and I don't ever remember seeing any youtube, etc that did it. Has to be real life. Someone comes to vacuum my office once a week. I get the tinglin feeling every time she's there. Of course, someone combing or styling my hair does it (more likely to happen if it's random and informal vs a haircut at the salon). Or someone giving me instructions and showing me how to do something (a simple, physical task) will trigger it. I try to hold onto it but it is so often too fleeting a sensation.
“There is a bit of culinary seduction or sensualized seduction in those videos, and some of our minds go there because they are young females,” Richard said. “I would not label them erotic ASMR, which is much more blatant. These are food ASMR. ASMR inherently has a strong tone of intimacy, so there is an aspect of connectivity associated with ASMR that can overlap into things like sensuality or sexualization, but they are different.”
I experience this occasionally. The strongest occasion was approx 12 years ago. I was in the “High Country” NE Victoria, North of a town called Mansfield. I was out hunting Sambar Deer, 10 K’s from my off sider and in open bush land. About 1 Hr prior I came across droppings from wild dogs which were prevalent in the area and a real problem for farmers. I had this sensation all over my head and down my neck, it scared me. I had the feeling someone, something was watching me and was a bit shaken. I pulled myself together and continued my hunt. Never came across any deer or anything else that day.

There are deeper meanings to "bliss". As more and more people mature, process their emotions and connect with others and their true purposes, "bliss" will happen between more and more people. Basically it's asexual, a bit pleasurable but more importantly it wakes up more areas of the brain/body-complex. People processing this need to activate their bodies more in other to balance the maturing mind/spirit-aspects of their being ("grounding"), and the physical activity may also help with backpains. The tendency of such people is to be a bit too seclusive, so need to remember to assert oneself more as well.
Listening to a binaural recording through headphones simulates the binaural hearing by which people listen to live sounds. For the listener, this experience is characterised by two perceptions. Firstly, the listener perceives being in close proximity to the performers and location of the sound source. Secondly, the listener perceives what is often reported as a three-dimensional sound.[33] This means the listener can perceive both the position and distance of the source of sound relative to them.
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