Of course, when I go looking for it, these things won't give me shivers but it's very calming and pleasurable. There are also other singers and bands like Digital Daggers, Kanon Wakeshima, Lacey Sturm, etc., that could give you shivers and such. Also I like to listen to classical type music, music boxes, pianos, violins, soundtracks, like fantasy type music composed by people like Peter Gundry, a very famous violinist named Lindsey Stirling, soundtracks from RWBY or Vampire Knight, etc. These may not actually be asmr but it could be very shiver inducing and pleasurable.

I work at a call center and have the opportunity to hear many different voices but none have given me any sort of ASMR response. Although I’ve always liked my own voice to a certain extent and I actually like it when the caller can’t hear me ’cause I put my hand in front of my mouth and let my tone reverb into the mike while allowing myself to hear how I sound a bit better. I never really thought of why I’ve liked my own voice until yesterday. I was giving an average sales pitch in a radio-esc tone and I felt a sense of ecstacy behind my ears mostly but also reaching from the entire back half of my head and sllightly down my neck. I don’t think it’s just the sound of my voice that triggered the response. I think it was the literal vibration within my body that created the sensation. When I come to think of it, it felt similar, yet better than how it feels when I sing and think I’m doing well. I know this sounds conceded but It’s a physical sensation ranging from good to ecstacy with my voice. It’s nothing like; I’m awesome and better than everyone else. It just feels good to speak with a deep tone.

A group of psychologists at the University of Sheffield published a paper earlier this year in the journal PLOS One that reported for the first time that people who report experiencing the sensation actually do appear to have a physiological response: their heart rates tend to slow down. The researchers recruited 112 individuals, half of who reported experiencing ASMR and the rest of whom reported not experiencing the sensation and monitored everyone’s heart rate while watching an ASMR video.
I have definitely had this sensation many times from sexual activities, or leading up to them, as foreplay. Also while masturbating from about age 2 and up, instinctively using effleurage upon my own skin, as I comforted myself to help me sleep. I don’t see why anyone would be troubled if this phenomenon is associated with sexuality. It is undoubtedly sensual, and so is sex, so it is natural for there to be some overlap.
Like those who posted before me, I have experienced ASMR for many years. My earliest memories are around the second grade. In my second grade class, we were required to read with partners; however, I was a more advanced reader and would allow my partner to read the entire time if he/she wanted. I would experience intense tingling around the crown of my head listening to him/her read, but I would also experience very intense tingling in the frontal lobe region watching him/her turn the book pages. Around the same time, I would intentionally watch Bob Ross on PBS (like others have mentioned) to take a nap due to the same tingling sensation and calm/relaxation he induced.
And part of the reason it is seemingly addictive is that it causes your brain to release endorphins (feel good hormone) in an easy and effective manner. Doing that regularly can cause you to crave more. So far it seems harmless, I never heard of someone who has issues because of it. And the research done seems to say it is harmless. But it is just a good feeling induced through sound rather than a substance so you seek more of it. Just enjoy it for all those who cannot
Although little research exists on the science behind ASMR, some researchers have theorized how it works. Richard, for one, said ASMR triggers could stimulate the "biological pathways" that humans use when bonding with a romantic partner, close friend, or family member, thus eliciting "similar responses like feeling comforted, feeling relaxed, and feeling secure."

I've been aware of the ASMR feeling since about always, but I really thought it was something everyone got. As common as breathing, so it never occurred to me to speak about it until recently when I gave my sister a few links that made me feel these triggers and she felt nothing or was even greatly annoyed... then I came across reading about it and realized, not all people get it. (They're totally missing it, I like it a lot!)
I have definitely had this sensation many times from sexual activities, or leading up to them, as foreplay. Also while masturbating from about age 2 and up, instinctively using effleurage upon my own skin, as I comforted myself to help me sleep. I don’t see why anyone would be troubled if this phenomenon is associated with sexuality. It is undoubtedly sensual, and so is sex, so it is natural for there to be some overlap.

While I will admit that ASMR (and sleep) is definitely the kind of thing that admits of “more” and “less” descriptors, I’m still not convinced that it is “intensity” that is the proper target of the “more” and “less” (btw, do you see what I mean? “intense” by itself isn’t a term of comparison. You need to introduce “more” and “less” for this… but more and less what?). However, I’ll also admit that I’m at a loss to suggest a better term. Maybe this is the kind of thing that merits it’s own category, and eventually we’ll just say that something is more or less ASMR… doesn’t quite have the same ring to it though…


One category depends upon external triggers in order to experience the localized sensation and its associated feelings, which typically originates in the head, often reaching down the neck and sometimes the upper back. The other category can intentionally augment the sensation and feelings through attentional control, without dependence upon external stimuli, or 'triggers', in a manner compared by some subjects to their experience of meditation.[citation needed]
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But the phenomenon has nonetheless burst into the mainstream, thanks to mounting media coverage and a few high-profile references: “Saturday Night Live” alum Molly Shannon gushed to Conan O’Brien about her “head orgasms,” induced by the methodical touch of airport security pat-downs; novelist Andrea Seigel shared her experience with ASMR on the radio program “This American Life” last year; the “Dr. Oz” show has featured ASMR videos as a way to ease insomnia.
If you want to find out more about ASMR Videos or how to find them check out the ASMR Videos page. Often the most successful ASMR videos will include a variety of triggers, and sometimes that combination can produce much more of an effect than the isolated triggers themselves, for some good examples of this check out our round-up of cranial nerve exam videos.
My most intense experiences were triggered by a human voice. The sensations rise up from my upper back and shoulders and wash over my neck and scalp. By mentally replaying these voices I could repeat the sensation but for a shorter period and not quite as intense. I’ve just discover this is ASMR and I am fascinated by other’s experiences with this incredible euphoric sensation. Oh, and it’s entirely non-sexual for me as well.
I first got the tingles (as I called them) at seven years of age, I would be sitting with a friend, or alone, listening to the radio, drawing, talking, suddenly everything gets hushed, quite, talk is low, personal, close. To me, it feels like Empathy Overload! Deep feelings of shared tragedy, celebration or experience, in song, speech or shared moments of complete silence. But it’s empathy operating at a very high level, that’s what I feel. A deep understanding of the law and order of… everything,

Well. I started getting ASMR or Empathic Enlightenment as I called it, since the late 70’s. At a family gathering in ’79, I spoke with an old hippie Artist, a Painter, a friend of my mothers, who told me it was “Enlightenment”. Empathy for a moment shared he said. He too, was inflicted with the ability, and spoke in a hushed tone about it, Bob Dylans “Hurricane” played in the background, as he told me about the metaphysical and artistic side of life. I never forgot that night, and “Hurricane” is still my favourite song.


I relate to much of what has been said in this conversation thread. I remember as a child, young, maybe seven… my punishment for disobedience or back talking was to stand in the corner. The corner was made by the cold wall and the refrigerator. The refrigerator was old and would kick on often blowing warm air through the crack between it and the wall. I did not know why I got tingly but I loved it and remember asking if all my punishments could be to stand in the corner. It believed it was the difference of temperatures between the wall and the refrigerator motor that caused it. Now, as an adult, I still sit over heat vents with my cheek or arm rested against the wall. I wonder why sometimes it is so intense. I get the tingles that crawl all the way down to my toes and cause a mild jerk or convulsion that sets it off again. I have synesthesia and also wonder if that serves to increase the frequency or intensity of the feeling…
I’ve expereienced ASMR since childhood. Listening to Bob Ross was one of the more memorable, but I would also tap my pencils and school supplies, and leaf through books to get the same sensations. When I found ASMR videos on Youtube I first learned it was called “ASMR”. I didn’t know it had a name. Since then, I’ve watched lots of ASMR videos, and I’ve reached “immunity” on some triggers – tapping doesn’t work for me as well as it used to, but it works better after taking long breaks away from it. Slient hand movements in some of the reiki/aura cleansing videos work well. The triggers that affect me most now seem to be more visual now than auditory. Massage ASMR, Free Spirit ASMR, LuneInnate and Rose Harmonics are the Youtubers I follow who do lots of hand movement triggers. I also really like Ephemeral Rift, ASMR Node, and RaphyTaphy (even if their styles tend more to tapping, which doesn’t work as well for me any more).

A: It’s been pretty crazy to wrap my head around numbers. We just hit 1.6 million YouTube subscribers, and that’s such a wild number to me. I’ve made a lot of really incredible relationships with people and friends that I’ve met in real life to hang out with. I love my community. They are the sweetest, they are smart, and they are thoughtful. The ASMR community is nice because people just want to relax. They’re not here for the drama or anything crazy or over the top. They just want to chill.


I’m so glad this has a name and there are more people out there with it!! I thought it was only me haha. Also this weird thing happens to me where in real life and on tv or whatever, when I see someone who I find fairly attractive starts comforting another person and trying to help them with something I get this weird tingly and bubbly feeling in my stomach and in my brain. I know the stomach region isn’t typically classified as being affected by asmr but I don’t know what else to classify that feeling I get. It’s weird.
You can kind of understand why. To people who don't experience ASMR, the videos can rightly look completely ridiculous. Also, because a sense of intimacy can be a very powerful trigger, it's no surprise that some of the best artists are very attractive girls, and there's clearly some personal security risks when you're putting your face out there and developing strange online relationships with people who might start to rely on a false sense of intimate connection with you.
I have definitely had this sensation many times from sexual activities, or leading up to them, as foreplay. Also while masturbating from about age 2 and up, instinctively using effleurage upon my own skin, as I comforted myself to help me sleep. I don’t see why anyone would be troubled if this phenomenon is associated with sexuality. It is undoubtedly sensual, and so is sex, so it is natural for there to be some overlap.

So. I found out about this roughly… an hour ago. And holy… what an hour it’s been. I didn’t even know I could feel this type of stuff (although for most it seems to be in their head/scalp/neck etc, for me, it’s in my chest.). My biggest trigger seem to be taps… from the crisp tap to a low thump. One thing I am noticing though, is how many girls do the videos (I can understand this, as a female voice generally has a more relaxing effect.) but I was wondering how many people prefer a male voice? Any preference to accents, etc.
Does it always start in your ears? When I’m sick, sometimes my ASMR starts automatically but I can always control it and stop it later if my muscles are aching badly (like a flu). I shudder sometimes too without even triggering my ASMR. I think the shudder is a warning or something, not sure. It actually makes thunder sounds in your ears? I’m curious now.. I can never get it to make sounds, but I’ve noticed something when I touch dogs or cats sometimes when I do it.. very unique but strange/good reaction from pets.
Well finally I got a name for it, I was experiencing it when I was a child, especially strong when some neighborhood girl was doing some girly tests with me with her fingers crossed or something. Totally felt like I was in a trance, and a pleasent feeling on the back of my neck and head. Also a strong one was when I was watching flight attendants show the safety precautions on every plane, weird gestures with their hands showing belt and emergency exists, but only from beautiful women (not men). Also when I watched these flight attendants on youtube, very strong sensation. You should include this type of video. I think it is a rather intimate feeling not meant to be shared with many people (anonymous people on the internet don't count) :D

I first encountered ASMR, as do most people, as a child. I never knew exactly what it was. I experienced it when certain teachers spoke, during certain TV shows and at the dentist. I didn’t understand the sensation but enjoyed it, and would try and stay very calm and relaxed every time it happened to try and lengthen my experience of it. You can read the full story of how I found ASMR in this post.
Just curious if I’m alone in this– I don’t get ASMR from physical sounds or sensations, but I get it VERY strong from certain songs or concepts that have emotional impact, or from having an understanding of some sensory experience (such as a song) that I didn’t before. It doesn’t matter whether the emotion means anything to me, personally, but if the singer sounds like they mean it it’s a trigger.
The term ASMR was coined in 2010 by Jennifer Allen, a 39-year-old penetration tester. “For years I thought, ‘Jeez, maybe I have a brain tumour or something,’” she recalls. From 1999 onwards, Allen searched steadfastly for others like her online. In the late noughties, she stumbled upon a SteadyHealth.com forum in which a user named okaywhatever51838 discussed a “weird sensation” that “feels good”.
The explanation behind this physiological reaction lies in the brain. "It's likely that the tingling is due to specific neurochemicals (like oxytocin and endorphins) being released during ASMR—and these neurochemicals are also inducing the deep feeling of relaxation," says Craig Richard, PhD, an ASMR researcher, professor at Shenandoah University in Virginia, and author of Brain Tingles. In a 2018 study published by Richard and his colleagues, they found that ASMR activated similar regions of the brain as those activated during affiliate behaviors, which includes interpersonal bonding (such as parent-infant bonding) along with grooming and care-giving behaviors that involve positive personal attention. These behaviors share similar triggers with ASMR, such as gentle touch, soft voices, focused attention, and a bond of trust.
ASMR doesn’t work for everyone and it can be tough to imagine the sensation if you don’t experience it first-hand. For most people who do experience it, the blissful tingling starts up in the scalp and then makes its way through the body to the arms and legs. And as a result, it can trigger a feeling of relaxation before bedtime, which can help you overcome insomnia. The audio/video segments are long—in fact, some last up to an hour. They are lengthy so that you can keep watching or listening to them until you drift off.
While little scientific research has been conducted into potential neurobiological correlates to the perceptual phenomenon known as 'autonomous sensory meridian response' (ASMR), with a consequent dearth of data with which to either explain or refute its physical nature, there is voluminous anecdotal literature comprising personal commentary and intimate disclosure of subjective experiences distributed across forums, blogs, and YouTube comments by hundreds of thousands of people. Within this literature, in addition to the original consensus that ASMR is euphoric but non-sexual in nature, a further point of continued majority agreement within the community of those who experience it is that they fall into two broad categories of subjects.
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