You can kind of understand why. To people who don't experience ASMR, the videos can rightly look completely ridiculous. Also, because a sense of intimacy can be a very powerful trigger, it's no surprise that some of the best artists are very attractive girls, and there's clearly some personal security risks when you're putting your face out there and developing strange online relationships with people who might start to rely on a false sense of intimate connection with you.
Never heard of ASMR before stumbling on these videos on Prime. They sure seemed weird after I took a few quick looks. So... I looked up ASMR. Not much scientific research on it. Hardly any interest showing. But among the people whom it works for, the interest is huge. Apparently, large e-communities sprang up in a grass roots fashion. There are even genres and sub- genres, from what I can tell from looking into it over the last week. The guy in this video is one of the creative people exploring these positive effects that can be brought out in some people. I was surprised as hell that this video was pleasant and relaxing to me. No "tingles" for me but much relaxation. Apparently different people react to different sounds, visuals, rhythms, etc. I commend this guy and others for exploring this new-to-me aspect of at least some of us humans. If this sounds interesting to you, look into the efforts of this guy and others. Maybe you will be surprised, as I was, to find value in some of their works. Cheers! And use headphones or at least ear buds, not speakers.
A: It’s been pretty crazy to wrap my head around numbers. We just hit 1.6 million YouTube subscribers, and that’s such a wild number to me. I’ve made a lot of really incredible relationships with people and friends that I’ve met in real life to hang out with. I love my community. They are the sweetest, they are smart, and they are thoughtful. The ASMR community is nice because people just want to relax. They’re not here for the drama or anything crazy or over the top. They just want to chill.
I thought everyone gets this ??? I’ve just discovered it’s called ASMR by accident, russell brand has done a YouTube video on it . I then went on to look for myself what it was. I then realised the sensation it was aiming at ,, the one I get all the time if I listen to a nice female call centre agent for example on the phone if I’m being sold something, I sonetimes even drag it out but then I get paranoid they know what I’m doing…. As I said I thought everyone had this sensation , I did try and describe it to my mother earlier and she didn’t know what I was talking about ,,, now I find this sort of information that not everyone gets it and I can watch these videos and get it on tap ,,,,,,, what does this mean????? I am interested in meditation too but never actually got anything amazing from it,,, does this mean Asmr is some way of meditation?? Amazing if true , how cool! Peace xx

Never heard of ASMR before stumbling on these videos on Prime. They sure seemed weird after I took a few quick looks. So... I looked up ASMR. Not much scientific research on it. Hardly any interest showing. But among the people whom it works for, the interest is huge. Apparently, large e-communities sprang up in a grass roots fashion. There are even genres and sub- genres, from what I can tell from looking into it over the last week. The guy in this video is one of the creative people exploring these positive effects that can be brought out in some people. I was surprised as hell that this video was pleasant and relaxing to me. No "tingles" for me but much relaxation. Apparently different people react to different sounds, visuals, rhythms, etc. I commend this guy and others for exploring this new-to-me aspect of at least some of us humans. If this sounds interesting to you, look into the efforts of this guy and others. Maybe you will be surprised, as I was, to find value in some of their works. Cheers! And use headphones or at least ear buds, not speakers.
Smithsonian: "How Researchers Are Beginning to Gently Probe the Science Behind ASMR" — "The burgeoning Internet phenomenon was so new, it didn’t even have a name. It was so strange and hard to describe that many people felt creepy trying. It resided at the outer edge of respectability: a growing collection of YouTube videos featuring people doing quiet, methodical activities like whispering, turning magazine pages and tapping their fingers. Some viewers reported that these videos could elicit the most pleasurable sensations: a tingling feeling at the scalp and spine, coupled with euphoria and an almost trance-like relaxation.

I’m so glad this has a name and there are more people out there with it!! I thought it was only me haha. Also this weird thing happens to me where in real life and on tv or whatever, when I see someone who I find fairly attractive starts comforting another person and trying to help them with something I get this weird tingly and bubbly feeling in my stomach and in my brain. I know the stomach region isn’t typically classified as being affected by asmr but I don’t know what else to classify that feeling I get. It’s weird.

I never realized this sensation had a name, but have been experiencing it from childhood. While studying about kundalini rising, I read the analogy of the thousand petal lotus blossoming on the crown of the head. I thought, ah, I know what that feels like! Sometimes reading letters from friends triggered it. Getting “picked” during a game of 7 Up triggered it. Having someone do the trick of pulling imaginary string from my palm triggered it.
Generally speaking, ASMR content creators are essentially self taught YouTubers who have experienced this feeling all of their lives just like the viewers. Those that have been creating content for many years have literally been developing these techniques since they started. Working with the early childhood memories of triggers, adapting these for a video setting, trying out new ideas, developing those seen done by fellow content creators, viewer suggestions and feedback. Personally it’s been an interesting journey with trials, errors and successes to develop the skills I have now and there is still a way to go with more ideas to explore. Not just in video format but live and in person sessions.
Hi! I am not sure if I experience ASMR or not. The only thing that I know is when someone whispers, speaks (low/high notes) close/near my back I get chills/tingles/tickling sensation. But when the sound doesn’t travel straight to my back, I dont get chills. I have been searching for answers and ASMR is the only thing close to it. I hope that you guys can help me. Thanks.
So how do you know if you have ASMR? There’s no single way to tell for sure, but for starters, you can watch some of the internet’s most popular videos and determine whether they elicit a tingling response. And for your convenience, we’ve compiled some of the best ASMR videos that YouTube has to offer—so get those goose bumps ready, and while you’re at it, try these brain teasers to find out whether you’re smarter than an astronaut.
She has invested in her craft, upgrading to top-notch binaural microphones that carry every exhale into a listener’s ears as if Maria is standing beside them. Her videos, like most ASMR recordings, are undeniably intimate. But the intended response — although often described as “brain orgasms” — is not sexual, ASMR enthusiasts insist. (Unsurprisingly, a few of the creepier online comments insist otherwise.)
In a 2012 blog post, Steven Novella, an academic clinical neurologist at Yale University School of Medicine, compared ASMR to migraine headaches — “We know they exist as a syndrome primarily because many different people report the same constellation of symptoms and natural history,” he wrote — and theorized that ASMR could even be a type of “pleasurable” seizure.
I've been aware of the ASMR feeling since about always, but I really thought it was something everyone got. As common as breathing, so it never occurred to me to speak about it until recently when I gave my sister a few links that made me feel these triggers and she felt nothing or was even greatly annoyed... then I came across reading about it and realized, not all people get it. (They're totally missing it, I like it a lot!)

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Lacy is no cliché pageant mum. Lounging on the sofa with wet hair and a grey T-shirt emblazoned with a peace sign, she sits back, scrolling on her phone, to let her child speak candidly. She does not push Makenna to answer in a favourable way, nor is she pushing her daughter into stardom in pursuit of fame or riches. “She makes significantly more money than I do and works significantly less than I do,” laughs Lacy, sitting with her legs tucked underneath her on the large brown suede sofa in the middle of the family’s modest apartment. “She doesn’t have to babysit or dog-sit or anything, so it works out good.” Makenna smiles shyly, showing off pink braces. “I do want to babysit though! I like kids.”
Finally something to explain my “photocopier man” feeling which has been a standard joke in our family. I first discovered this feeling when I was a teenager working in an office where a repair man would come regularly to maintain the photocopier and I would experience this sensation of well-being while he was working. It was in a fairly small office and usually he would clean the screen with an acetone base cleaner so I always thought that the fumes from that created a mini “high”. I have had it at various times usually when there is someone repairing something in the office eg putting data cables, fixing sockets etc. I now work in a research lab and have had it when participants are in another room being tested with senors on their heads and I have no visual or auditory input from them just the sense of them being there. I have had it to a lesser extent from acupuncture and find massage of any kind extremely unpleasant. It’s nice to find out that it’s not just me that has this strange feeling for no apparent reason.
The only way someone can feel what we here, obviously feel, that isn’t inflicted with ASMR. Is to go out with friends, to your favourite club, drop pure MDMA, and wait….I’ll see you on the dance floor. I’ll be the six foot seven Infantry Soldier, waiting for you to come dancing, I’ll be dancing with the biggest smile on my face, for you, dancing with friends, lovers, strangers, until we’re all fucking annihilated, lying on the dance floor, in one mind, one moment, one achievement, shared and experienced together, forever and ever and ever. Then we go home, have a shower, lie down, and feel refreshed, and wonderfully happy, exhilarated just to exist, Lying there, that very moment, is what ASMR feels like. That beautiful feeling of peaceful serenity and contentment, just to be alive and kicking, together, connected, forever. That chemically induced empathic euphoria, is the only feeling that comes close to what ASMR feels like.
I relate to much of what has been said in this conversation thread. I remember as a child, young, maybe seven… my punishment for disobedience or back talking was to stand in the corner. The corner was made by the cold wall and the refrigerator. The refrigerator was old and would kick on often blowing warm air through the crack between it and the wall. I did not know why I got tingly but I loved it and remember asking if all my punishments could be to stand in the corner. It believed it was the difference of temperatures between the wall and the refrigerator motor that caused it. Now, as an adult, I still sit over heat vents with my cheek or arm rested against the wall. I wonder why sometimes it is so intense. I get the tingles that crawl all the way down to my toes and cause a mild jerk or convulsion that sets it off again. I have synesthesia and also wonder if that serves to increase the frequency or intensity of the feeling…
Like many corners of the internet, there’s also a sense of comradery in being outside the norm. According to the Instagram user who runs an chalk-eating ASMR repost account, this has helped build trust in the community. “We all know we are a little left of average in what we find stimulates our ASMR experience, so there’s solidarity and kinship as well," the user said.
It's also not something that affects everyone. Apparently only part of the population "gets" ASMR, just like not everyone "gets" magic-eye pictures or Beyoncé. It could even be a genetic thing for some, like the people who were born with the crossed wires that make them think cilantro tastes like Comet. The actual science on ASMR is scant, and some neurologists aren't sure that it even exists. Those who do think that the tingling feelings produced by ASMR might be tiny seizures. But for those who do experience ASMR, there's a wealth of material out there to give you a brain boner.

Wow similar and different from me. I listened to ASMR every night for about 6 months when I felt tingles for the first time. It was for probably less than 2 seconds, then a month or two passes before it happens again. But it is happening more often but still randomly. Some weeks I do not get the feeling, other times it is multiple times a week. But every time it is for less than 3 seconds. I am questioning if it is just pins and needles but feels nice because the asmr is so soothing. But you are the first person I have found who had a “delayed” experience. My brain might just be making this up due to my repeated listening and intense research into the subject.

Since then, I've been watching a vast array of long and otherwise incredibly boring videos specifically designed to produce the ASMR response. Most people I've mentioned it to have no similar response at all, and can't imagine why I'd sit and bliss out to an 18-minute video of a Russian girl folding towels, or a Greek girl waving her hands in my face, or somebody tapping their fingernails on a wooden box.


ASMR refers to the pleasurable sensation people experience when exposed to various specific triggers, either from ASMR videos or in their everyday lives. According to a 2015 study from Swansea University in Wales—the first peer-reviewed research into ASMR—whispering is the most common trigger for ASMR, with 75% of participants experiencing ASMR sensations from it. The other most common triggers were personal attention, crisp sounds (like tapping or crunching), and slow movements, as reported by the group of 475 participants.

Like those who posted before me, I have experienced ASMR for many years. My earliest memories are around the second grade. In my second grade class, we were required to read with partners; however, I was a more advanced reader and would allow my partner to read the entire time if he/she wanted. I would experience intense tingling around the crown of my head listening to him/her read, but I would also experience very intense tingling in the frontal lobe region watching him/her turn the book pages. Around the same time, I would intentionally watch Bob Ross on PBS (like others have mentioned) to take a nap due to the same tingling sensation and calm/relaxation he induced.
I wish I could have downloaded only two tracks and they were the Affirmations; however I liked the whispers, not the lip smacking, and the whispering Guided Sleep Relaxation which does work for me. However I don't understand the role playing, gum chewing, lip smacking, tapping and listening to bags crinkle. I didn't enjoy hearing them nor do they do anything to give me my asmr fix. I have my Bob Ross dvd's for that. However my asmr fix comes from watching, rather than listening. I guess it gets down to attention to detail and I enjoy watching people paint, plastering walls and laying concrete. I'm detail oriented and I enjoy watching others perform jobs that require it. As I wrote I just wish I could have bought two tracks, instead of the whole album.
ASMR, or “autonomous sensory meridian response,” is the term for the sensation people get when they watch stimulating videos such as this one. Many people describe the feeling as “tingles” (or “head orgasms“) that run through the back of the head, neck, and, spine. For some, the feeling is deeply relaxing and can even cause them to fall asleep. This is definitely not something I experienced.
For many years I had no clue what asmr even was. I just knew I could think and hear things and it happens. I was eating lunch yesterday, I had a sarano pepper. I usually have a pepper of some type with at least one meal a day. This pepper was multi colored, very different from my norm. I have never, had a response from eating any food. Within a second or so of biting into this pepper, my head was going insane. Far more intense than any response before. So intense I stopped eating and waited several minutes for it to calm. Wanted to test it again more bites equaled more response. I kept the pepper, it had a very diffrent flavor from any I had before. I want the seeds!!!! Lol. Anyone had this happen to them? I’m shocked and have never heard of actual food triggers. These responses we’re intense and a quite a bit longer. I actually stopped eating the pepper, as after the 4th round my head felt tired and that I would get a head ache.
While little scientific research has been conducted into potential neurobiological correlates to the perceptual phenomenon known as 'autonomous sensory meridian response' (ASMR), with a consequent dearth of data with which to either explain or refute its physical nature, there is voluminous anecdotal literature comprising personal commentary and intimate disclosure of subjective experiences distributed across forums, blogs, and YouTube comments by hundreds of thousands of people. Within this literature, in addition to the original consensus that ASMR is euphoric but non-sexual in nature, a further point of continued majority agreement within the community of those who experience it is that they fall into two broad categories of subjects.
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