Pica, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, is when an individual craves materials that can’t strictly be considered “food” for a period that’s longer than a month. This could include chalk, but also materials like clay, sand, dirt, glue, paper, and pretty much any other material you can imagine. It’s common in children, but it also occurs in teens and adults with unknown prevalence.


The ASMR sensation is incredibly relaxing and the videos made on Youtube are to trigger that feeling. However since they began in 2009 their popularity has grown very quickly and a huge worldwide community alongside. Viewers describe how watching ASMR videos specifically have helped them to overcome insomnia, anxiety, PTSD and times of depression. As well as using them for general relaxation, pain management, focus meditation during childbirth, a means of falling asleep quickly and background sounds during the night or during study. Viewers find the content creator’s videos to be nurturing and comforting too. We’re also seeing more and more testimonies from parents with Autistic children who use the videos for sensory stimulation and those who simply like to enjoy cuddle time with their little ones whilst watching.


I was not a loser or social outcast. I had many friends but just preferred sci-fi and geeky interests to school politics. I had loving parents. I have had MANY positive interactions and attention. So I am still curious why certain interactions that seem identical will cause it and others wont. I have searched for years trying to understand the difference.
Being only thirteen, a new year at school always brings the excitement that I might get a teacher with one of those perfectly soft ASMR-y voices. I've only had one, but luckily I had her for two grades (grade two and three) she came from Ireland, but didn't have too strong of an accent, just enough that it would always relax me. Dang I miss that class... LOL.
Because ASMR is such an individualistic experience, different triggers affect some people more than others. Not everyone experiences ASMR to the same intensity and the effects can differ from person to person. However, ASMR is most commonly described as a pleasurable "tingling" sensation that begins in your scalp and creeps its way down your neck and your back, sometimes spreading out to the limbs. Others describe it as "goosebumps on the brain" and "warm chills," a shivering feeling you might get if someone was gently tracing their finger down your spine. Some say it's like the pins and needles sensation when your foot falls asleep, but pleasurable instead of painful. These tingles are always accompanied by an overwhelming feeling of peaceful relaxation and euphoria; many people report feeling their anxiety slip away, and they often fall asleep afterword.
Lacy is no cliché pageant mum. Lounging on the sofa with wet hair and a grey T-shirt emblazoned with a peace sign, she sits back, scrolling on her phone, to let her child speak candidly. She does not push Makenna to answer in a favourable way, nor is she pushing her daughter into stardom in pursuit of fame or riches. “She makes significantly more money than I do and works significantly less than I do,” laughs Lacy, sitting with her legs tucked underneath her on the large brown suede sofa in the middle of the family’s modest apartment. “She doesn’t have to babysit or dog-sit or anything, so it works out good.” Makenna smiles shyly, showing off pink braces. “I do want to babysit though! I like kids.”
Yes. Mostly cognitive for me as well. I’ve experienced it hundreds of times while watching movies during particularly tender, deeply emotional, or intellectually stimulating scenes when the actors/narrators speak thoughts that resonate with me. I have also experienced this at church when someone reads scripture or teaches on a subject that suddenly triggers an “aha moment” for me; a feeling of revelation and connection to what I perceive is the spirit of God. Your comment was made a year ago, but I hope you read my response.
I have had ASMR for as long as I can remember, but had no idea it was actually a recognised thing! I only get mine from for example; someone looking through my makeup bag, or using something of mine, anything that is gentle and concentrated (if that makes sense) I watch ASMR videos which are makeup tutorials or spa role plays – they are amazing for relaxation and sleep.

I've been aware of the ASMR feeling since about always, but I really thought it was something everyone got. As common as breathing, so it never occurred to me to speak about it until recently when I gave my sister a few links that made me feel these triggers and she felt nothing or was even greatly annoyed... then I came across reading about it and realized, not all people get it. (They're totally missing it, I like it a lot!)
In my case, I enjoy the most when it occurs naturally in a real world situation. I would suggest you to play some online response related games (color-word match etc.,) for couple of minutes daily and try 1 or 2 ASMR trigger videos at a time. I hope you will get to experience ASMR on some videos at least. Even you play response related games like the color-word match or odd - even number match or the Vowel & consonant related Yes/No kind of games found in the internet for 10 to 15 minutes, I believe you will get at least a basic feeling of ASMR when you are simply resting or when you are calm without having to induce it through videos. Hope this helps. Trust me, it is a really, really good feeling. If it still doesn't work, forget it, no hard feelings. Like I said, I experience it once in blue moon, but never crave for it although I enjoy it when it happens naturally :)
Did you ever ask your siblings or friends to draw letters on your back or draw on your arms as a child? Absolutely love story time at school? Like having your hair played with? REALLY enjoy haircuts, eye tests, having your feet measured? Love drifting off to the sound of other school pupils putting their pencils away? Listening to someone in a waiting room flipping the pages of a magazine? Did any of these things make you feel what you thought were shivers down your back or a sparkly feeling in your head? Did they make you feel quite dreamy and sleepy? If so then you are ASMR sensitive.
This is the first time I’ve ever heard of self controlling or self-triggering it. Huh. I suspect that everyone’s experience is different, with each one having their own triggers and abilities of control. Must the same way some people can wiggle their ears or scalp muscles, while others can’t. Being able to identify and internal structure and control it is completely individual. LOL My sister’s husband could cross one of his small toes over the other, they way we do when we cross our fingers. It was an odd thing he could control, much as “justwondering” is able to self-trigger his/her ASMR.

‘Attention Induced Head Orgasm’ was the first recorded name for this experience and can be found when searching for ASMR origins. I believe (unfortunately) theres always going to be a sexual association. Also, the fact our body is flooded with endorphins also gives those who either a) lack in knowledge and b) the media a reason to think ASMR has such a strong sexual link.

A few weeks ago, Maria says, she was contacted by a young woman whose grandmother was in a hospice. The elderly woman was no longer very responsive, but when the granddaughter played Maria’s videos, “it made her grandmother happy and calmed her down,” Maria says, recalling the woman’s message. “She said, ‘This is so great, because we don’t know how else to help her.’ ”
I remember that I used to wait around at work in the evening sometimes for the cleaners to come in & for whatever reason, would just really enjoy listening to the different cleaning sounds & the vacuuming. I just loved the fact that sometimes after a tough day at work I could just listen to the cleaners for about 20min & just feel a little “tingly” & very relaxed. Not something you can really explain to your colleagues though… They would probably think you are a big wierdo!
The website for ASMRtist United looks remarkably like it was created by a child – which it was. Founded in August 2017 by 14-year-old Jacob Daniel, the “company” offers advice to ASMRtists under the age of 18. There is a guide on how to filter sexual comments, advice on coping with cyberbullying and a post entitled “How do I stop my school from finding my channel?”.
2. Do you get rush through the spine and scalp when catching adrenaline? For example, while doing sports and trying to boost myself even further, I watch Zombie pov clips, like this one – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvICHck3PIg, I get huge rush of adrenaline up the spine and neck, because I feel like I’m running in that clip. But I also get peaks of euphoric rush in my head and I scratch the scalp, the crown of the head in circles. It’s definitely not ASMR I am experiencing, but the same thing – scratching the crown of the head is attributed to both, ASMR and this.

Thanks for your comments Elysium. I used the term orgasmatron simply because this is the name by which I’ve always known those massagers. I didn’t make up the word, i believe it was a brand name that they were originally available under, perhaps that was just in Australia. But I understand your point. I’m planning a page outlining this issue, so I’ll be sure to include that link and clarify the text when that is ready.


"As ASMR has started to come to mainstream attention, researchers have finally begun trying to answer that question. Neuroscientists are now experimenting with fMRIs and electroencephalography to see if the brains of 'tingleheads,' as they are called, are any different than those who don’t tremble at the sight of napkin-folding. They’ve also surveyed tens of thousands of people who say they experience the phenomenon. So far there are intriguing—if limited—findings suggesting that ASMR may relieve some people’s symptoms of stress and insomnia, and that the brains of those who experience it may be organized a little differently."
I accidentally clicked on a youtube makeup review video not knowing what ASMR was. They were unboxing some beauty purchase and I thought they'd show the product but there was all this scratching awfulness. I downvote rarely but it was so deeply unpleasant. There were other videos with ASMR in the title and I clicked on a few - same thing. Spine-tingling, hair raising allright but for me it's so so unpleasant. Am I the only one? I literally feel pained by some of it! And the ones where the ladies whisper to be soothing I suppose but what's most salient to me are the lip smacking type of sounds that are just one step below someone eating slurpy and annoying. I hate hate hate the sounds of people's lip smacking type sounds as they speak. I was baffled that this ASMR was apparently a pleasurable thing for people based on there being channels devoted to it whereas I could tolerate only a few seconds of each, no more than 20-30 seconds that is if I forced myself to see if it turned into a better experience somehow. No no no... I feel at best mild disgust and at worst like someone is sending electric shocks through my spine. Then I looked it up and I see and "get" what it's supposed to be, but I just can't experience it as a positive thing and I can't expose myself to more of it as it's just subjectively awful for me! Am I alone? Are there people who hate this stuff? Perhaps this has to do with my sensory sensitivity? I have neuropathic pain, which messed up a lot of touch sensation for me so I thought maybe that is why. But thinking back, even before I got the neuropathy, I didn't like to be touched much, I would feel pain during massages that others seemed to enjoy, and for as long as I remember since childhood I had an area on my scalp down near the nape of my neck, that if touched directly (e.g., scalp massage) or indirectly (e.g., during haircuts) would send an unpleasant shiver down my back all the way to my pelvic bone in the back. I always tried to suppress reacting to these but would then avoid massages and would hold on to my chair when that area was stimulated during haircuts (and eventually started cutting my own hair). I have always hated smacking lip sounds - I can't eat if someone is eating loud and lose attention if someone is talking with lip sounds. I have sensory sensitivities such that I cannot stand fluorescent lights, and even incandescent bright lights and need to be in soft lighting. I also cannot tolerate noise or strong odors at all. So it would seem like I am the type of person who needs the soothing types of sensory experiences others seem to get from ASMR. I need soft, soothing sensory environment or else I have increased anxiety, tension and my chronic pain gets worse. I would seem like I would benefit from something like ASMR in theory, but paradoxically, everything I have tried to expose myself to so far that was called ASMR, I couldn't stop fast enough. They were not simply not pleasant but I found them clearly aversive - deeply uncomfortable and like nails on chalkboard awful in some cases. I have studied neuroscience, psychiatry and neurobiology, obtaining a PhD and have over a decade working in neuropsychology. Trying to guess why I am having no lu: nck with ASMR - in fact, having completely the opposite response! - I considered the following: I have autism in my family, mostly high functining but this is also often associated with sensory sensitivities. While I do not have ASD diagnosis, I score rather high on autism scales, mainly on sensory sensitivities and systemising approach dimensions (and not on social dimensions). I am very intrigued by this unexpectedly negative response I have to these and wondering if this is something that is also found and if so, what is known about it.
You’re at a Super Bowl party, heading to refill your plate with nachos, when you’re stopped by the sounds of Zoe Kravitz softly whispering into microphones and gently tapping her nails against a bottle of Michelob Ultra. You’re captivated, oddly relaxed and even feeling a little tingly. You, my friend, have just experienced ASMR — or autonomous sensory meridian response.

So many people have experienced the ASMR sensation as long as they can remember and for a long time many searched for visual aids on TV and YouTube. Shopping Channels, Antiques Roadshow and Children’s art shows to name a few have in the past been regularly frequented by people looking for instant triggers for their ASMR. However Bob Ross and his show ‘The Joy of Painting’ is considered by many to be the Godfather of ASMR!

If you don't like any of these, there are lots of other options. The top YouTube “ASMRtists,” like ASMR Darling and Gibi ASMR, have over a million subscribers and hundreds of videos each. You can also explore “unintentional ASMR:” content not created with tingles in mind, but that just so happens to promote them. (Painter Bob Ross has a cult ASMR following).

Yes, i used to meet with a woman once a month. She would get to my desk and start talking. I felt i was in a trance, like she was affecting my brain waves. She had had a brain injury and surgery. I later met another lady who was a neighbor and she had the same effect on me. It was later discovered that she had a brain tumor. I’ve never had that experience before or since except sometimes fluorescent lights cause the same feeling.
"Good evening, this is Maria again with you. This video is going to be dedicated to your relaxation," says the young, blond woman in a soft voice. She moves slowly from the left side of your screen to the right, and you feel her whispering voice deep within each ear. She picks up a hairbrush, running her fingernails along the bristles and tapping the back of it. She blows into your ear and tickles you with a feather. As the video continues, you begin to feel increasingly relaxed and your eyes droop. The whole time she is speaking gently to you. "We come home and we want to relax," she whispers, petting the camera. "We want someone to pat us on the head and say how good we are. We want someone to comfort us, to tell us that we're so great...that we're appreciated. You are appreciated."
Another article, "Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state", by Nick Davis and Emma Barratt, lecturer and post-graduate researcher respectively in the Department of Psychology at Swansea University, was published in PeerJ. This article aimed to 'describe the sensations associated with ASMR, explore the ways in which it is typically induced in capable individuals ... to provide further thoughts on where this sensation may fit into current knowledge on atypical perceptual experiences ... and to explore the extent to which engagement with ASMR may ease symptoms of depression and chronic pain'[4] The paper was based on a study of 245 men, 222 women, and 8 individuals of non-binary gender, aged from 18 to 54 years, all of whom had experienced ASMR, and regularly consumed ASMR media, from which the authors concluded and suggested that 'given the reported benefits of ASMR in improving mood and pain symptoms...ASMR warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic measure similar to that of meditation and mindfulness.'
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