I didn’t know there was a name for this! I experience the shivers whilst just sitting and using my imagination to draw white light into the top of my head and the sensation just shoots down my spine like bubbling tickles. Kinda cool to do it on command, but even more fun when it happens randomly through certain music, power tools, meditations, and someone else touching certain fabrics ~ for e few examples. Mostly only occurs when I am already relaxed though.
According to YouTube estimates, there are more than 45 million ASMR videos uploaded to the site, and, over the past year, there has been a marked increase in children making ASMR-related videos. Richard hypothesises that our brain is probably more receptive to an unknown child than a strange adult, making it easier for some individuals to be relaxed by ASMR videos featuring children.

I can trigger my ASMR at any time and it helps me gather my thoughts and calm down easily. It is weird to do, I have just recently found out about it and I was really strange knowing that not everyone could just do it anytime, sometimes or not at all so this is so strange before I found this out I thought I was just giving my self goosebumps just without the bumps so those are my feelings I just had to get out of my system.
Aside from the pleasurable sensation that ASMR offers there are a range of other benefits. Many intentional ASMR videos are essentially forms of guided meditations, meditating regularly has been shown to reduce stress levels and aid concentration among many other things. For a lot of people ASMR is a gateway to developing an ongoing meditative practice. 
Any cursory Googling will bring up videos from the doyenne of ASMR, an Eastern European woman named Maria who goes by the handle GentleWhispering and who constantly sounds like she's on the verge of crying as she attempts to trigger the chills by blowing into a high-tech microphone or folding towels. Her most popular videos have reached over six million views.
For instance, you’re probably familiar with soap cutting ASMR videos, which sound like a xylophone, or emptying a bag of Scrabble letters onto a table. But more broadly, ASMR posts generally seek to trigger an autonomous sensory meridian response—a tingly feeling provoked by certain noises and sensory inputs. The community is huge: there are currently over 5.3 million Instagram posts tagged under #ASMR on Instagram (the genre is hugely popular on YouTube, too.)
I also happen to be able to trigger asmr at will pretty much instinctively; the intensity sometimes is weak though if i cant concentrate due to interference. The intensity is far greater than when it is caused by external stimuli though. Anyone alse capable of directing the feeling (always starts at the base of the skull for me) to parts of their body at will??

That could be the beginnings of asmr yes. This is how it starts for me but I don’t always need to be touched to get it the tingling can start by watching an ASMR video or seeing something in everyday life that will trigger it also. Maybe look on YouTube and try out a few different videos and see if you trigger but even if you don’t that doesn’t mean you don’t have it. Some aren’t triggered by artificial means and need a genuine real life trigger to feel ASMR. Just try out different things or get someone to play with your hair for a while and you will know for sure if you have it.
The first study to perform actual brain imaging (fMRI) on subjects currently experiencing ASMR tingles (as opposed to individuals who were merely able to experience the phenomenon) was published in BioImpacts in September 2018. Subjects viewed several ASMR videos with a screen and headphones while inside the MRI scanner. The study found a significant difference in brain activation between time periods when the subject reported tingling (communicated by pressing a button), as compared to time periods when they were watching a video but not reporting tingling (communicated by pressing a different button, to control for brain activation effects caused by merely pressing a button). They concluded that "the brain regions found most active during the tingling sensations were the nucleus accumbens, mPFC, insula and secondary somatosensory cortex", and suggested that these were similar to "activation of brain regions previously observed during experiences like social bonding and musical frisson".[29]

It seems at the moment that the answer is no. Not everybody reports experiencing this sensation. Most people discover it by accident in their childhood, however some adults experience it for the first time. If you haven’t experienced ASMR before, it might just be that you haven’t found your personal triggers yet. Check out our article detailing the common triggers to see if any of them do it for you.


In the middle of the ASMR spectrum I have all sorts of triggers. A deep male voice reading Holy Scriptures. Definitely not as spiritual a response as the Cantor, but still pleasant, even so. A favorite trigger is good music, either played or sung. Usually it’s a voice that does it for me, more so than instruments. Depending on the type of song, lyrics and the melody/drums, music can trigger a wide range of ASMR types for me. Some are very much at the spiritual end, while others bring back the memory of ASMR events, and the memory itself triggers a mild repeat. Really good foods (eating or even smelling them) can trigger tingles in head and shoulders; while a head, back or foot massage can all be triggers, depending on the skill of the person.

You can kind of understand why. To people who don't experience ASMR, the videos can rightly look completely ridiculous. Also, because a sense of intimacy can be a very powerful trigger, it's no surprise that some of the best artists are very attractive girls, and there's clearly some personal security risks when you're putting your face out there and developing strange online relationships with people who might start to rely on a false sense of intimate connection with you.
Imaging subjects' brains with fMRI as they reported experiencing ASMR tingles suggests support for this hypothesis, because brain areas such as the medial prefrontal cortex (associated with social behaviors including grooming), and the secondary somatosensory cortex (associated with sensation of touch) were activated more strongly during tingle periods than control periods.[29]
I only found out that my physical sensations were a ‘thing’ that not everybody experiences yesterday, after listening to a radio program about it. Like you, Mary, I have a whole range of experiences from momentary euphoric head ‘lifts’ to all-over tingling and prickling (not always very pleasant). These sensations have also been associated with a whole range of experiences, including sexual ones. Music is a massive trigger of my sensations, as is spiritual experience or prayer. As for religious music – Orthodox chant will definitely get me there, and singing with my shape note group is indescribably intense. So thank you for your brilliantly described experiences which have helped me to see my spectrum of sensations as part of a whole…something.
I’m so glad I read these few posts before I commented on my experience, and asked what the best thing may be for me that is non physical. I was a child care provider for 20 years, and the first time I experienced what your describing as an adult, was when one of the babies crawled to my painted toe nails, and started touching my toes very softly. The feeling was so soft, so gentle and she looked so cute with her concentration on those red toe nails lol. The feeling was not sexual in anyway, it felt like love exhaling from my soul, and my head neck and arms felt like goose bumps but very soft and tingly. After that, I found that playing drawing games on our backs with the kids, was how to feel that everyday. Honestly, kids touch sooo gently, they are so naturally innocent, it feels like an angel pacing through your body, and I often would fall asleep with them when we did it at nap time. This feeling of such innocence seems to be a trigger for me. So how do I find that feeling with no human touch? As a child, my mother would put me to sleep with what our family calls “ticky”, its very soft touch with the fingers gliding across your arm or back and neck. It’s a sure way to fall asleep, but how do u get that tingly feeling in your scalp without touch? And I had one of those head massagers before, he’s it felt nice, but nothing like how u can relax from someone else’s touch on your skin so soft it’s like a skin wisper. Sigh, I have no one who gives me human touch. And haven’t for many years now. I feel so alone physically ( not sexual). Sorry for such long note, but I have not slept in weeks, literally, I can’t sleep more than an hour or two, and not until sunup. I’m so physically and mentally exhausted, I cry for God’s help at night. PLEASE HELP ME WITH THIS! I need the simplest and fastest suggestions, thanks. Sad Sue xo.
I would spend all Friday, Saturday drawing outlines with my 3 best friends, discussing art, colour and symmetry for hours, then spend all Saturday night bombing trains, painting together would activate it intensely, in the dark, spooky and exhilarating all at the same time, while four kids spent their weekends silently breaking the law to paint Top-to-Bottom Wholecars just for art’s sake)
Why does this exist? Because some people experience ASMR, aka autonomous sensory meridian response, a condition that means certain sounds cause you to experience a pleasant, tingly feeling on your scalp, or around the top of your spine. Sounds weird, has in fact been around for a while – by late 2016, approximately 5.2 million ASMR videos had been uploaded to YouTube.
So far I have experienced all The common ASMR triggers. However the best ones are those when I’m listening to music, more specifically electronic or EDM. As chessy as sounds I have discovered that my ASMR can be triggered during the end of climatic build ups or bass drops and the feeling is pure bliss. All you need is a decent pair of noise cancelling headphones or an isolated room with kickass Sub … Works every time

Kelly knows that she inspires other kids to take up ASMR – children at school ask for advice on how to make popular YouTube videos. At one football game recently, kids swamped Kelly for photos. “It was like… crazy,” Kelly whispers dramatically. “I went with friends and we walked past this group of cheerleaders and they all got quiet. They came up one after another and were like, ‘Let’s take a picture.’”
Another article, published in the journal Television and New Media in November 2014, is by Joceline Andersen, a doctoral student in the Department of Art History and Communication Studies at McGill University,[36] who suggested that ASMR videos comprising whispering 'create an intimate sonic space shared by the listener and the whisperer'. Andersen's article proposes that the pleasure jointly shared by both an ASMR video creator and its viewers might be perceived as a particular form of 'non-standard intimacy' by which consumers pursue a form of pleasure mediated by video media. Andersen suggests that such pursuit is private yet also public or publicized through the sharing of experiences via online communication with others within the 'whispering community'.[37]
I am intrigued by how vast the ASMR community seems to be. I have strange tingling sensations on the top of my head, so I typed this in to google and ASMR info appeared. On all the different sites and notice boards etc. I have not seen a description however that matches my trigger so I think I might be experiencing something slightly different. My sensations are triggered by people next to me sleeping and beginning to dream. I get the tingle and then become aware that the person is twitching the way people do when they dream. It has happened to me with my boyfriend a lot, my sister once when we had to share a bed. It also happened with a complete stranger next to me on a plane and even once with my cat when he was dreaming. It’s not an unpleasant sensation but I wouldn’t say it was the ecstatic sensory experience that others have described. It has also happened in a more everyday waking experience way, when I worked with a young man with autism who was verbalising in a way that wasn’t clear communicative speech but rather jumbly kind of talk. I am interested if anyone else has had a similar experience to this. Thanks
A: I thought it was awesome. They hit the nail on the head. You can tell they did their research: They had the binaural microphones, had her whispering back and forth. They had tapping, nice sounds. They definitely watched content and had done their research on what ASMR is supposed to be. They, of course, blew it up, made it Hollywood, used a big budget, and so it was very cool. They were accurate.
The content creators are almost exclusively women, and while a large number of them post captions in Russian, there are women from all around the world posting videos of themselves chewing and swallowing chalk. And it’s not a small genre. The #chalkeating tag on Instagram has over 71,000 posts to date, and similarly, the #chalkasmr tag has over 34,000 posts.
I don’t know if I have the asmr described here, but I find myself getting something like ‘warm chills’ along my back and head. They often happen when I relax myself or feel apprehensive. Examples are; during wreck it Ralph when Ralph was falling towards the mentos on coke bottle mountain. I was getting Butt tons of these. Or maybe when I am sort of tense and its a cold day, I move around a little and feel some tingles. I get these tingles whenever I expect something sort of intense to happen; explosions, a crushing impact, the defeat of a character I love. But only when I expect it, never during.
In a 2012 blog post, Steven Novella, an academic clinical neurologist at Yale University School of Medicine, compared ASMR to migraine headaches — “We know they exist as a syndrome primarily because many different people report the same constellation of symptoms and natural history,” he wrote — and theorized that ASMR could even be a type of “pleasurable” seizure.

If you’re not one of Payton’s 443,000 subscribers, then you’re probably currently asking yourself something along the lines of, “Why the heck do people want to watch someone eat a pickle?” The answer, quite simply, is ASMR: or autonomous sensory meridian response. This term is used to describe the sensation, normally a tingling, that people get in response to an auditory or visual cue (like someone eating a pickle). It’s been described as a type of auditory-tactile synesthesia, and it can be triggered by everything from whispering to the crinkling of wrapping paper. The term was coined in 2010 by Jennifer Allen, the founder of the first Facebook group for people who experience the phenomenon, and it has been referred to as ASMR ever since.


I just discovered I was capable of triggering tingles on purpose this past month, after it popped into my head one day to seek out a video of a cat grooming itself (my trigger) to see if I could purposely trigger that weird relaxing feeling that I had experienced occasionally growing up, but had never really fully thought about. So that was pleasant. Then oddly enough a week ago I attempted to articulate this experience to a friend at a party (not knowing the term ASMR – nor even aware that it was a known thing, I simply described it as this peaceful, totally non-sexual, relaxed feeling I get from watching cats grooming themselves). Against all odds, this friend said, “oh, you’re probably experiencing ASMR – you should look it up.” Needless to say – it’s nice to find that indeed there’s an entire community of people online that have the same capability. Thought I’d share my experience and ask a couple questions.

Some of the biggest ASMR artists on YouTube—like Gentle Whispering ASMR and Gibi ASMR—have racked up millions of subscribers, with millions of views for some of their videos. These creators are triggering the ASMR experience in countless ways. Sometimes, it's as simple as tapping their fingernails next to their microphone or whispering gently to their camera. Other times, they're roleplaying everyday situations and making them feel far more intimate; for example, a stylist taking your measurements for clothes or a doctor giving you a check-up.
YouTube banned Makenna’s channel for three days in November but reinstated it after discussions with the family. The company’s delayed decision against its largest child ASMRtist leaves questions about whether the phenomenon can be adequately monitored. Videos featuring the sexualisation of minors are banned by the site, and ASMR “mouth sound” videos now fall within this remit. Yet at the time of writing, a search for “child ASMR mouth sounds” on YouTube brings up hundreds of videos with a disturbing number of views.

From the tongue-clicks of Janelle Monae’s ‘Make Me To Feel’ to the crunchy bite of an apple that punctuates Superorganism’s ‘Something For Your M.I.N.D’ (surely the quintessential ASMR song?), via actual Macca munching carrots on The Beach Boys’ ‘Vegetables’ and the general click-fest that is the Soulwax remix of Metronomy’s ‘Love Letters’,  step this way to ASMR nirvana.
OH.MY.GOD. I just read an article in, of all places, the Daily Mail (I know, shame on me) which lead me to this. I have tried a few times to explain this sensation to people and they look at me like I’m deranged, so I stopped. And then I discover here that it’s a real ‘thing’, and then I discover someone whose trigger is exactly the same as mine! Other people touching things that belong to me! That’s it. It only happens then. The last time it happened was when my children were babies and people touched them. Before that it was things like my pencil case or books when I was at school. Then, when I was older, it was things like my make up bag. Weird. Anyway, I hear ya, and I’m so amused to have discovered that other people have it too.
Question: I am new to ASMR and have yet to find any triggers that cause me to have the ‘tingles.’ (I have experienced the ‘tingles’ in real life situations, so I know what the sensation is, I just can’t remember what triggered them!) I have heard that ASMR videos are more effective with headphones. When people say this, do they mean *any* type of personal listening device (such as ear buds, like I am using) or do they mean a set of actual, over-the-ear headphones? Could the use of ear buds be contributing to my difficulty finding my trigger?
Richard, who is also the author of Brain Tingles: The Secret to Triggering Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response for Improved Sleep, Stress Relief, and Head-to-Toe Euphoria, estimates around 20 per cent of the population experience strong ASMR. What triggers people may come down to individual preferences. “The key to triggering ASMR is to create gentle sounds,” he says. Richard’s own triggers include eye exams and [the Netflix series] The Joy of Painting with Bob Ross.
Can ASMR be triggered by a completely internal stimulus? I get this tingling in my scalp and cheeks, then like a wave of warm fuzzy that washes through my body. It sounds very similar to what ASMR is described as, but it happens to me when I daydream about certain things. It happened to me more as a child than as an adult, in fact it has probably been several years since I had an experience until today, which led to me googling it. My trigger is visualizing/ daydreaming about somewhat exciting things gone perfect, a perfect lap on the motocross track, flying high G maneuvers, and most recently navigating my sailboat through some rough waters. I hate to admit to this because I don’t want to sound egotistical, but it doesn’t seem to be the subject of the daydream that brings about the ASMR like experience, but the thought of someone giving me recognition for my accomplishment that actually triggers it. Also, once I’ve had a response from a daydream about a particular experience, I can’t simply revisit the same daydream and have it trigger another experience. I’m 40, and have always experienced this, but I never knew how to explain it or if it were normal or not, so I’ve never even tried talking about this before.

The type of "bliss" I experience can most easily be experienced at train stations or airports, where lots of people move, though I wasn't open to this before practicing meditation, yoga and seva, so may take time to develop and is not an end goal in itself. End goal should be the journey, to make steps in the directions you truly desire and attract, compromising oneself a bit less.

I first remember experiencing asmr on ecstasy when I was 16 years old. I am now in my thirties and have been addicted to heroin/opiates for the past 12 years. I recently went into treatment for the first time and as I was sitting in these large AA meetings I would get an intense tingling sensation starting at my head that would sometimes spread throughout my body. It would definitely happen when I would hear something particularly emotional or inspiring. It’s probably the greatest natural high I’ve ever felt aside from breaking into hysterical laughter (which I did plenty of at the treatment center). But yeah, great site here and I looking forward to learning more about the world of asmr!
I never realized this sensation had a name, but have been experiencing it from childhood. While studying about kundalini rising, I read the analogy of the thousand petal lotus blossoming on the crown of the head. I thought, ah, I know what that feels like! Sometimes reading letters from friends triggered it. Getting “picked” during a game of 7 Up triggered it. Having someone do the trick of pulling imaginary string from my palm triggered it.
Hi I’ve had these sensations all my life. Can anyone else have these sensations by just thinking? It took me time but now I can control the way the waves go ie left side or right side, half way down or all the way down the legs and how strong the sensation is but always starting at the head. I’m sure everyone gets the sensation when listning to music and other stuff like that but can anyone tell me if others can control this sensation and if it is used in meditation? I get this sensation when relaxing but also when im in some kind of threat and it makes me more calm in case I need to defend my self. some times I cant control it and happens when im out and about but most times control able, its like electric tingles that go in waves one after the other and you can hold one wave for awhile in one spot of body, just thinking about is giving me the tingles.
Try out a few of the most popular ASMRists (as they're known) on YouTube, like Ilse of TheWaterWhispers, Maria of GentleWhispering, or Taylor of ASMR Darling. Each of these channels covers a range of triggers and, while some videos last upwards of 30 minutes, most ASMR enthusiasts report tingling after only a few minutes of concentrating on the sounds.
She has invested in her craft, upgrading to top-notch binaural microphones that carry every exhale into a listener’s ears as if Maria is standing beside them. Her videos, like most ASMR recordings, are undeniably intimate. But the intended response — although often described as “brain orgasms” — is not sexual, ASMR enthusiasts insist. (Unsurprisingly, a few of the creepier online comments insist otherwise.)
ASMR refers to the pleasurable sensation people experience when exposed to various specific triggers, either from ASMR videos or in their everyday lives. According to a 2015 study from Swansea University in Wales—the first peer-reviewed research into ASMR—whispering is the most common trigger for ASMR, with 75% of participants experiencing ASMR sensations from it. The other most common triggers were personal attention, crisp sounds (like tapping or crunching), and slow movements, as reported by the group of 475 participants.
A: It’s been pretty crazy to wrap my head around numbers. We just hit 1.6 million YouTube subscribers, and that’s such a wild number to me. I’ve made a lot of really incredible relationships with people and friends that I’ve met in real life to hang out with. I love my community. They are the sweetest, they are smart, and they are thoughtful. The ASMR community is nice because people just want to relax. They’re not here for the drama or anything crazy or over the top. They just want to chill.

It now drives an entire industry on YouTube, where video artists rack up millions of views filming an array of audio and visual triggers for their viewers: They whisper, tap their fingers, flip through pages of a book, play with slime, slurp up noodles, make “mouth sounds” and even role-play scenarios like a spa visit or a doctor’s appointment — anything to evoke the sensation.
"Seven years later, ASMR is having a pop culture moment—even if many of those who use it don’t know what the acronym stands for. The phenomenon’s most popular practitioners have more than half a million subscribers, and the doyenne of ASMRrtists, Maria of Gentle Whispering ASMR, has been so successful that she’s been able to quit her job to role-play soothing cosmetologists, librarians and flight attendants full-time. But what is ASMR? What function does it serve, who is drawn to it, and why? Or, as researcher Craig Richard puts it: 'Why are millions of people watching someone fold a napkin?'
For instance, you’re probably familiar with soap cutting ASMR videos, which sound like a xylophone, or emptying a bag of Scrabble letters onto a table. But more broadly, ASMR posts generally seek to trigger an autonomous sensory meridian response—a tingly feeling provoked by certain noises and sensory inputs. The community is huge: there are currently over 5.3 million Instagram posts tagged under #ASMR on Instagram (the genre is hugely popular on YouTube, too.)
Addressing the issue here of the wire scalp thingy… yeah that one’s right smack in the center of Sensual. Nothing sexual about it, though – for me – nothing particularly Spiritual either. I’ve only ever seen them sold as “Scalp Tinglers”, and didn’t find it very special. I much prefer my Denman scalp massagers. THOSE trigger intense ASMR’s for me. My whole body from crown to toes feels like it’s melting in joy when I scrub my head with two of those things, one in each hand. WOW.
What if you don’t NEED any triggers? I have been experiencing ASMR just by will since second grade. I can have it whenever I want it, hot or freezing weather, standing, sitting, running, resting, busy, doesn’t matter. I can just do it over and over and over again with very little meditating involved or sometimes even none, just need to focus and BOOM, the brain wave goes throughout my body and the tingling and such. I can even touch some people and they get that weird wonderful sense but very limited. Just recently I can get all my fingers to have tingling feelings (before was just back of my palm, but it’s advancing, but I’m a bit worried if this is good or bad for health..)… Anybody like me at all? I feel so alone in this world for decades… and my friends just think I’m weird and creepy when I perform it (always have goosebumps)
Unusual choice of name.. big smiles, I can turn it on or off without my normal triggers, but only just discovered that today when I read an article about it… WOW!! Other people do this too…. I have had this all my life…history leaves room for improvement and I believe this has been an escape from that for me. Dont be lonely!! Crikey, those goosebumps are hard to come by for some people and are a friend in themselves. Not strange, I always freak out going to hairdresser or watching gift wrapping, sure they can see my goosebumps which are SO not sexually motivated!! but until now I have always thought that would be assumed..which is SO wrong, Thank god for waiting rooms and health magazines! All I need to do get a tingle is recall the one I felt this morning.
There is no solid data about ASMR, no published research studies — not yet. The term “ASMR” is nonclinical, coined in 2010 by a woman named Jennifer Allen who started an ASMR Facebook group and later became part of a team — along with Richard — that collected and analyzed anecdotal information about the sensation. Richard also notes the work of Bryson Lochte, a Dartmouth College undergrad who has used neuroimaging technology to study ASMR for his senior thesis but has not published his results.
The contemporary history of ASMR began on 19 October 2007 on a discussion forum for health-related subjects at a website called Steady Health.[22] A 21-year-old registered user with the handle "okaywhatever" submitted a post describing having experienced a specific sensation since childhood, comparable to that stimulated by tracing fingers along the skin, yet often triggered by seemingly random and unrelated non-haptic events, such as "watching a puppet show" or "being read a story".[23]
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