Have you ever felt a static-like or tingling sensation on the top of your head when someone brushes your hair or whispers to you? The feeling may travel down your arms and your spine, and it likely makes you feel very relaxed. Some call it a “sparkly” feeling, and it might happen when you hear someone crinkle a piece of paper or when someone traces a word on your back.


An article titled "An examination of the default mode network in individuals with autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR)"[38] by Stephen D. Smith, Beverley Katherine Fredborg, and Jennifer Kornelsen, looked at the default mode network (DMN) in individuals with ASMR. The study, which used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), concluded that there were significant differences in the DMN of individuals who have ASMR as compared to a control group without ASMR.
I have always had a little AMSR throughout my life. However, I have been meditation for about a year and the AMSR has kicked in big time over the last month. I didn’t know what it was and everyone I talked to about my experiences couldn’t relate – and a few thought I had lost it Eventually the web came through for me and I have a name for my experiences.
And part of the reason it is seemingly addictive is that it causes your brain to release endorphins (feel good hormone) in an easy and effective manner. Doing that regularly can cause you to crave more. So far it seems harmless, I never heard of someone who has issues because of it. And the research done seems to say it is harmless. But it is just a good feeling induced through sound rather than a substance so you seek more of it. Just enjoy it for all those who cannot
I don’t know what happened but I was sitting on top of my robe and was on top of a bean bag and was trying to get rid of my tablet pass code and all of all sudden my face gets warm and goes down to my feet and lasts for about 2-3seconds before it was gone. I don’t know if I have it or not but if I do I hope I find my trigger. Also can some one post a list of things that might prevent triggers and how to make them happen?

Many of those who experience ASMR report that some specific non-vocal ambient noises are also effective triggers of ASMR, including those like the sound of rain, fingers scratching or tapping a surface, the crushing of eggshells, the crinkling and crumpling of a flexible material such as paper, or writing. Many YouTube videos that are intended to trigger ASMR responses capture a single person performing these actions and the sounds that result.[15]
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