I remember the first time i experienced ASMR: I was laying on the couch when i was 5, I think i was having bad dreams and wanted to sleep closer to my parents. The dryer was going and my head was tingling the whole time. I will never forget that first time. Just this year i found out about the ASMR community and i finally have the answer that i have been looking for! So happy!
But the phenomenon has nonetheless burst into the mainstream, thanks to mounting media coverage and a few high-profile references: “Saturday Night Live” alum Molly Shannon gushed to Conan O’Brien about her “head orgasms,” induced by the methodical touch of airport security pat-downs; novelist Andrea Seigel shared her experience with ASMR on the radio program “This American Life” last year; the “Dr. Oz” show has featured ASMR videos as a way to ease insomnia.
OMG I thought I was alone this whole time (and I am almost 30 years old). I thought I was strange and I thought I just was (and I hate to use this word but I don’t know another one to choose at this moment), attracted to these sounds.. even the Bob Ross one. I have loved the way certain sounds resonate with me ever since I was a very small child. I have purposefully bought movies and kept recorded TV shows on my DVR just so I can replay certain parts with the sounds and people’s voices that have triggered for me. I feel so relieved and happy to know there is a whole community of people just like me. This is actually the first time I have ever told a single person about my feelings on this. I have kept it hidden for years thinking someone would find me strange. I can’t even begin to describe the relief I feel knowing other people experience these triggers and feelings. I am excited to explore this further.
Like many corners of the internet, there’s also a sense of comradery in being outside the norm. According to the Instagram user who runs an chalk-eating ASMR repost account, this has helped build trust in the community. “We all know we are a little left of average in what we find stimulates our ASMR experience, so there’s solidarity and kinship as well," the user said.
At the other end of the spectrum, I had a memory of a sexual experience that was such a strong trigger that for almost 15 years after the event, just thinking about that experience could trigger an actual orgasm with full body ASMR. (sorry if that’s TMI) (And don’t anyone be too jealous, I’m now old, gray, fat and long past those days in my life, but I’ve got the memories. LOL)
I just went through all the videos on this page, and it seems I only respond to female voices. The other videos of scratching and stuff, didn’t do anything for me. Now that I think about it, I don’t get ticklish if I sit next to another guy. Even the music I listen to tend to be all female vocalists. I’m not a sexist, but I guess being a guy, I respond to higher-pitched female voices. At night, I hit the Japanese radio stations on my phone looking for female DJs and if I catch one talking, I close my eyes, and I’m sleeping before I can count to 20.
I am 69 female and have gotten a tingling in scalp in certain situations since I was a child. Just love it although it doesn't happen as often as when I was younger. Unfortunately, none of the videos did it for me and I don't ever remember seeing any youtube, etc that did it. Has to be real life. Someone comes to vacuum my office once a week. I get the tinglin feeling every time she's there. Of course, someone combing or styling my hair does it (more likely to happen if it's random and informal vs a haircut at the salon). Or someone giving me instructions and showing me how to do something (a simple, physical task) will trigger it. I try to hold onto it but it is so often too fleeting a sensation.

I am 69 female and have gotten a tingling in scalp in certain situations since I was a child. Just love it although it doesn't happen as often as when I was younger. Unfortunately, none of the videos did it for me and I don't ever remember seeing any youtube, etc that did it. Has to be real life. Someone comes to vacuum my office once a week. I get the tinglin feeling every time she's there. Of course, someone combing or styling my hair does it (more likely to happen if it's random and informal vs a haircut at the salon). Or someone giving me instructions and showing me how to do something (a simple, physical task) will trigger it. I try to hold onto it but it is so often too fleeting a sensation.

Austrian writer Clemens J. Setz suggests that a passage from the novel Mrs. Dalloway authored by Virginia Woolf and published in 1925, describes something distinctly comparable.[25][26] In the passage from Mrs. Dalloway cited by Setz, a nursemaid speaks to the man who is her patient 'deeply, softly, like a mellow organ, but with a roughness in her voice like a grasshopper's, which rasped his spine deliciously and sent running up into his brain waves of sound'.[27]

Any cursory Googling will bring up videos from the doyenne of ASMR, an Eastern European woman named Maria who goes by the handle GentleWhispering and who constantly sounds like she's on the verge of crying as she attempts to trigger the chills by blowing into a high-tech microphone or folding towels. Her most popular videos have reached over six million views.


In 2016 I became a qualified Sound Therapy practitioner through The Collage of Sound Healing in England. Then later a practitioner in Crystal and Himalayan Bowl treatments as well as Assemblage Point adjustment and Reiki. I wanted to understand better the effects of sound on the body and how I was possibly helping my viewers. These courses gave me a much deeper understanding of what I do on YouTube and the experience to go on and take ASMR back into the world where it started for me. I strongly believe the social aspect of nurturing one another should not be lost especially as we grow older. The internet should be a means for further connection, not stop us from experiencing it fully in person. It should be a tool and not a substitute.
I must admit that I had never heard of Bob Ross before I discovered ASMR, and chances are that if you live outside America this will be the case for you too. Technically speaking Bob Ross is simply provides a good combination of many of the other common triggers, but because of his widespread popularity as an ASMR trigger I thought he was worth mentioning on his own. The great thing about being triggered by Bob Ross is that you can buy full length DVDs so you can quickly and easily get some ASMR going from the comfort of your couch.
OH.MY.GOD. I just read an article in, of all places, the Daily Mail (I know, shame on me) which lead me to this. I have tried a few times to explain this sensation to people and they look at me like I’m deranged, so I stopped. And then I discover here that it’s a real ‘thing’, and then I discover someone whose trigger is exactly the same as mine! Other people touching things that belong to me! That’s it. It only happens then. The last time it happened was when my children were babies and people touched them. Before that it was things like my pencil case or books when I was at school. Then, when I was older, it was things like my make up bag. Weird. Anyway, I hear ya, and I’m so amused to have discovered that other people have it too.
“I can tell you first hand, I tried chalk, one of the natural kinds that everyone “loves” and I IMMEDIATELY knew it was not for me,” the user told Motherboard. “And I frequently tell people, and it is almost always young women, who ask me if I chew chalk or clay the reasons why I don’t: 1) It was a nasty experience from both a taste and textural standpoint; 2) Dental work is expensive, and I’m not risking mine for something that I don’t enjoy.”
Okay, science may never explain the shoe thing. But scroll through these lists, and the array of triggers is largely consistent: classical music, haircuts, movie trailers, Bob Ross, more Bob Ross, lots of Bob Ross, the painter best known for his popular instructional videos. Forget the bucolic landscapes; these Ross fans are fixated on his calming baritone and the rustle of his brush on the canvas.
Another unanswered question: why do some people experience ASMR while others don't? "The simplest answer is a genetic difference," says Richard. In the same way that some people dislike cilantro or have a high tolerance for alcohol, genetics could affect how sensitive someone is to the neurochemicals produced during ASMR. "The ability to experience ASMR could also be influenced by lifetime experiences, diet, medications, and many other factors," he says. "It's clear that researchers still have a lot to figure out."

Again, there’s nothing massively revolutionary about this – people were listening to CDs of waves crashing and whale sounds to relax in the ’90s. But the internet’s opened up a whole new world of ASMR goodness, with YouTube videos of strangers clicking their fingers, or even chewing gum loudly for your aural pleasure. Here, then, are the best songs for people blessed with ASMR. If you don’t have it, this may be somewhat baffling – but if you do, oh boy, will you enjoy ASMR-inspired playlist below. For anyone else, it’s just some really great songs.
Wow similar and different from me. I listened to ASMR every night for about 6 months when I felt tingles for the first time. It was for probably less than 2 seconds, then a month or two passes before it happens again. But it is happening more often but still randomly. Some weeks I do not get the feeling, other times it is multiple times a week. But every time it is for less than 3 seconds. I am questioning if it is just pins and needles but feels nice because the asmr is so soothing. But you are the first person I have found who had a “delayed” experience. My brain might just be making this up due to my repeated listening and intense research into the subject.

Just curious if I’m alone in this– I don’t get ASMR from physical sounds or sensations, but I get it VERY strong from certain songs or concepts that have emotional impact, or from having an understanding of some sensory experience (such as a song) that I didn’t before. It doesn’t matter whether the emotion means anything to me, personally, but if the singer sounds like they mean it it’s a trigger.
This is Maria, a 28-year-old Russian expat in suburban Maryland, starring in a YouTube video that has been viewed more than 7 million times. Hundreds of thousands of Maria’s devotees return again and again to listen to her hushed whispers as she assumes simulated roles — librarian, hairstylist, masseuse — and performs simple motions: folding towels, blowing smoke from an incense burner, flipping through the pages of a magazine.
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I frequently get seemingly random shivers throughout my body that last for a moment or two. To give these shivers some context, I was told this is what happens when "someone walks over your grave," (don't know if you guys have heard the expression?) Could these shivers be momentary glimpses of a real ASMR experience, or something else entirely? I've never really paid much attention to them before.
I experience this occasionally. The strongest occasion was approx 12 years ago. I was in the “High Country” NE Victoria, North of a town called Mansfield. I was out hunting Sambar Deer, 10 K’s from my off sider and in open bush land. About 1 Hr prior I came across droppings from wild dogs which were prevalent in the area and a real problem for farmers. I had this sensation all over my head and down my neck, it scared me. I had the feeling someone, something was watching me and was a bit shaken. I pulled myself together and continued my hunt. Never came across any deer or anything else that day.
A: It’s been pretty crazy to wrap my head around numbers. We just hit 1.6 million YouTube subscribers, and that’s such a wild number to me. I’ve made a lot of really incredible relationships with people and friends that I’ve met in real life to hang out with. I love my community. They are the sweetest, they are smart, and they are thoughtful. The ASMR community is nice because people just want to relax. They’re not here for the drama or anything crazy or over the top. They just want to chill.
Now, I need all the help I can get with fashion, but this video made my head buzz so hard I couldn't concentrate. I watched it three times, then went into the comments section and somebody had left a link to /r/asmr, a community of others that experience these relaxing head tingles in response to a wide array of stimuli. I was not alone. In fact, there seems to be quite a lot of us.
I’ve been experiencing ASMR since childhood, although Its only been about 6 months since I discovered that other people experience this same feeling. I have never really been able to “conjure” the tingles, they just come when they come. I have identified my triggers to be more of the one on one human interaction variety. Here’s my question: since discovering the ASMR community I have tried watching several different types of YouTuber’s (men, women, different styles, topics, etc.) but the videos (although they can be nice and relaxing) never make me feel the same as “the real thing.” Does anyone else find his to be the case? Have you discovered any way around it if so?

For many years I had no clue what asmr even was. I just knew I could think and hear things and it happens. I was eating lunch yesterday, I had a sarano pepper. I usually have a pepper of some type with at least one meal a day. This pepper was multi colored, very different from my norm. I have never, had a response from eating any food. Within a second or so of biting into this pepper, my head was going insane. Far more intense than any response before. So intense I stopped eating and waited several minutes for it to calm. Wanted to test it again more bites equaled more response. I kept the pepper, it had a very diffrent flavor from any I had before. I want the seeds!!!! Lol. Anyone had this happen to them? I’m shocked and have never heard of actual food triggers. These responses we’re intense and a quite a bit longer. I actually stopped eating the pepper, as after the 4th round my head felt tired and that I would get a head ache.
The main trigger though is being in large open areas with no one around, even seeing pictures of large open areas can trigger it. I used to work at a college that had several buildings, modern buildings, not ivy covered brick. One was not classrooms, but an area with offices and occasional banquets, so it was mainly empty and quiet. I used to sit there on breaks just to get that relaxation tingly sensation.Is this ASMR or something else?
At the other end of the spectrum, I had a memory of a sexual experience that was such a strong trigger that for almost 15 years after the event, just thinking about that experience could trigger an actual orgasm with full body ASMR. (sorry if that’s TMI) (And don’t anyone be too jealous, I’m now old, gray, fat and long past those days in my life, but I’ve got the memories. LOL)

Four months after Novella's blog post, Tom Stafford, a lecturer in psychology and cognitive sciences at the University of Sheffield, was reported to have said that ASMR "might well be a real thing, but it's inherently difficult to research...something like this that you can't see or feel" and "doesn't happen for everyone". Stafford compared the current status of ASMR with development of attitudes toward synesthesia, which he said "for years...was a myth, then in the 1990s people came up with a reliable way of measuring it".[41]

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