It's funny - for me some of these clips didn't quite work. But they sure did for my rabbit who listens to various forms of media - tv, radio, conference calls, me - most of the day. He usually is quite a passive listener and will only occasionally respond with ear turning or a change in position that shows he's listening to something different that has caught his attention.
i have only experienced ASMR very little. mines more physical. sounds dont really seem to trigger me. when i was in first grade we would have this exercise were we would outline a letter of the alphabet with are fingers on each others backs. the light touching sensation on my back would trigger me and i would sometimes fall asleep in class. on rare occasions it would trigger if someone did something for me like draw a picture for me. i never understood what it was in tell i found this web-sight describing what i felt. i am still looking for more triggers and wondering if any one else has had similar triggers.

I’ve had these triggers for years, going back to when I was around 8 years old. Years later, while watch Bob Ross, on PBS, I noticed that I fell asleep, and awoke 30 minutes later, totally relaxed. This happened with several other television shows as well as watching people involved in repetitive tasks, such as the lady at the gym, sweeping the floors or while having the hygienist clean my teeth. All I know is this: Whatever it is, it feels good in the back of my brain. This reminds me of my son’s study of binuarals-the constant tones, which, when experienced via headphones, causes different reactions, such as enhanced creativity or inner-peace. Perhaps those involved in Music Therapy will find this helpful in the treatment of their brain-injured patients. Congresswoman Gabby Giffords was given music therapy as part of her rehabilitation. It’s nice to have the internet to share these things.
A: I told my friends there was an ASMR commercial coming, and they thought it was funny. My friends are super supportive and tease me in a very sweet way. When it came on, they start screaming, “I’m tingling!” And everyone’s just screaming and like, “No way, this is crazy. I can’t believe this is on TV right now.” I had like 20 pairs of eyes turn and stare at me.
While most girls her age earned their pocket money babysitting the neighbours’ kids, Kelly spent that summer in her bedroom filming 50 custom-made ASMR videos. She would receive daily email requests for bespoke videos, shoot the footage, receive the money over PayPal (ten minutes cost $50, whereas for $30 (about £23) you’d get a five-minute clip) and upload the video to her YouTube channel, Life with Mak.
I used to think it was something religious then it was triggered by non religious music. I think mine is tied to ideas that seem to be deep and profound to me. When I really feel my place as one human among billions that is hurling through space on a small rock that is spinning around a constant nuclear fusion explosion. Connection to Humanity and Beauty.
"Good evening, this is Maria again with you. This video is going to be dedicated to your relaxation," says the young, blond woman in a soft voice. She moves slowly from the left side of your screen to the right, and you feel her whispering voice deep within each ear. She picks up a hairbrush, running her fingernails along the bristles and tapping the back of it. She blows into your ear and tickles you with a feather. As the video continues, you begin to feel increasingly relaxed and your eyes droop. The whole time she is speaking gently to you. "We come home and we want to relax," she whispers, petting the camera. "We want someone to pat us on the head and say how good we are. We want someone to comfort us, to tell us that we're so great...that we're appreciated. You are appreciated."

There are hundreds, if not thousands more of these videos out there. In researching this, what emerged what the picture of an addict who will stop at nothing crunchy, slurpy, or sticky to get his or her nervous fix. At the same time, the videos are oddly soothing—especially as all of these people throw propriety out the door and eat not only with their mouths open, but with microphones practically inside their mouths. To hell with convention, they seem to say. I'm going to whisper at you like a cartoon villain as I rhythmically inhale a plate of spaghetti up-close, gonzo-porn style. It's refreshing, if thoroughly and unambiguously disgusting.
Hi I’ve had these sensations all my life. Can anyone else have these sensations by just thinking? It took me time but now I can control the way the waves go ie left side or right side, half way down or all the way down the legs and how strong the sensation is but always starting at the head. I’m sure everyone gets the sensation when listning to music and other stuff like that but can anyone tell me if others can control this sensation and if it is used in meditation? I get this sensation when relaxing but also when im in some kind of threat and it makes me more calm in case I need to defend my self. some times I cant control it and happens when im out and about but most times control able, its like electric tingles that go in waves one after the other and you can hold one wave for awhile in one spot of body, just thinking about is giving me the tingles.
<3 I heard about ASMR a few months ago, and was amazed to learn that only a certain group of people got the head tingles hehe. Whenever I was younger, I would always make my mom braid my hair or brush it, because it would always give me the best shivers. Same with getting a haircut, or going for a doctors appointment. I always assumed it was normal to have those sensations, and that everybody got them. Turns out I was wrong!

"Anecdotally, people are also using ASMR videos to help with stress, depression, loneliness, and social anxiety," says Giulia Poerio, Ph.D., professor of psychology at the University of Sheffield in the UK. Poerio recently published a study in PLoS One that found ASMR does, in fact, help people feel calmer, less stressed, and less sad. It even tangibly lowers their heart rates—all suggesting ASMR may have very real, therapeutic value. Meanwhile, previous research in PeerJ reports the sounds can help temporarily alleviate symptoms of depression and chronic pain for those who are tuned into the tingles.
Can someone explain why this got rid of my migraine?? I have had a migraine for 2 days ( I get really bad chronic migraines – i have for my whole life ). I just recently discovered this ASMR thing, today actually. I watched the tapping/whispering ones and I felt these tingling sensations all over my body, mostly my head and arms, BUT holy heck my migraine is gone. I don’t understand! why?? It is a miracle if this works.
I’m slightly late to the asmr party – only just found out about it – and am still in disbelief.. Like a lot of people on here I’ve had it since childhood and thought I was the only person in the world who had it! Most intensely with dentists (talking to their assistants), school nurse inspections and air hostess safety demonstrations – the obvious ones let’s say – but also to a lesser degree with nature documentaries from the 1970s (British Columbia Forest documentaries) and the Open University (in the UK) course module videos, also from the 70s. Both of which featured fairly spaced out electronic music and softly spoken boffins..

I first got the tingles (as I called them) at seven years of age, I would be sitting with a friend, or alone, listening to the radio, drawing, talking, suddenly everything gets hushed, quite, talk is low, personal, close. To me, it feels like Empathy Overload! Deep feelings of shared tragedy, celebration or experience, in song, speech or shared moments of complete silence. But it’s empathy operating at a very high level, that’s what I feel. A deep understanding of the law and order of… everything,


I’m so glad I read these few posts before I commented on my experience, and asked what the best thing may be for me that is non physical. I was a child care provider for 20 years, and the first time I experienced what your describing as an adult, was when one of the babies crawled to my painted toe nails, and started touching my toes very softly. The feeling was so soft, so gentle and she looked so cute with her concentration on those red toe nails lol. The feeling was not sexual in anyway, it felt like love exhaling from my soul, and my head neck and arms felt like goose bumps but very soft and tingly. After that, I found that playing drawing games on our backs with the kids, was how to feel that everyday. Honestly, kids touch sooo gently, they are so naturally innocent, it feels like an angel pacing through your body, and I often would fall asleep with them when we did it at nap time. This feeling of such innocence seems to be a trigger for me. So how do I find that feeling with no human touch? As a child, my mother would put me to sleep with what our family calls “ticky”, its very soft touch with the fingers gliding across your arm or back and neck. It’s a sure way to fall asleep, but how do u get that tingly feeling in your scalp without touch? And I had one of those head massagers before, he’s it felt nice, but nothing like how u can relax from someone else’s touch on your skin so soft it’s like a skin wisper. Sigh, I have no one who gives me human touch. And haven’t for many years now. I feel so alone physically ( not sexual). Sorry for such long note, but I have not slept in weeks, literally, I can’t sleep more than an hour or two, and not until sunup. I’m so physically and mentally exhausted, I cry for God’s help at night. PLEASE HELP ME WITH THIS! I need the simplest and fastest suggestions, thanks. Sad Sue xo.
I experience this occasionally. The strongest occasion was approx 12 years ago. I was in the “High Country” NE Victoria, North of a town called Mansfield. I was out hunting Sambar Deer, 10 K’s from my off sider and in open bush land. About 1 Hr prior I came across droppings from wild dogs which were prevalent in the area and a real problem for farmers. I had this sensation all over my head and down my neck, it scared me. I had the feeling someone, something was watching me and was a bit shaken. I pulled myself together and continued my hunt. Never came across any deer or anything else that day.
You’re at a Super Bowl party, heading to refill your plate with nachos, when you’re stopped by the sounds of Zoe Kravitz softly whispering into microphones and gently tapping her nails against a bottle of Michelob Ultra. You’re captivated, oddly relaxed and even feeling a little tingly. You, my friend, have just experienced ASMR — or autonomous sensory meridian response.

Have you ever felt a static-like or tingling sensation on the top of your head when someone brushes your hair or whispers to you? The feeling may travel down your arms and your spine, and it likely makes you feel very relaxed. Some call it a “sparkly” feeling, and it might happen when you hear someone crinkle a piece of paper or when someone traces a word on your back.

While most girls her age earned their pocket money babysitting the neighbours’ kids, Kelly spent that summer in her bedroom filming 50 custom-made ASMR videos. She would receive daily email requests for bespoke videos, shoot the footage, receive the money over PayPal (ten minutes cost $50, whereas for $30 (about £23) you’d get a five-minute clip) and upload the video to her YouTube channel, Life with Mak.
"Good evening, this is Maria again with you. This video is going to be dedicated to your relaxation," says the young, blond woman in a soft voice. She moves slowly from the left side of your screen to the right, and you feel her whispering voice deep within each ear. She picks up a hairbrush, running her fingernails along the bristles and tapping the back of it. She blows into your ear and tickles you with a feather. As the video continues, you begin to feel increasingly relaxed and your eyes droop. The whole time she is speaking gently to you. "We come home and we want to relax," she whispers, petting the camera. "We want someone to pat us on the head and say how good we are. We want someone to comfort us, to tell us that we're so great...that we're appreciated. You are appreciated."
According to Setz, this citation generally alludes to the effectiveness of the human voice and soft or whispered vocal sounds specifically as a trigger of ASMR for many of those who experience it, as demonstrated by the responsive comments posted to YouTube videos that depict someone speaking softly or whispering, typically directly to camera.[12][13][14]
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