Hi! i have some questions about AMSR, I’ve been feeling it since i was very young but it is not on the scalp or neck, it has always been in the forehead, like it was a third eye or something. The sensation is the same, thats why I belive is AMSR, but the place has never been in the scalp. It’s really beautiful because i can feel how it spreads to all over my face, my eyes and cheeks. Has anyone else feel it on the forehead like me? Have you hear it of people like me that has the same sensation described like AMSR but in the forehead?
The first study to perform actual brain imaging (fMRI) on subjects currently experiencing ASMR tingles (as opposed to individuals who were merely able to experience the phenomenon) was published in BioImpacts in September 2018. Subjects viewed several ASMR videos with a screen and headphones while inside the MRI scanner. The study found a significant difference in brain activation between time periods when the subject reported tingling (communicated by pressing a button), as compared to time periods when they were watching a video but not reporting tingling (communicated by pressing a different button, to control for brain activation effects caused by merely pressing a button). They concluded that "the brain regions found most active during the tingling sensations were the nucleus accumbens, mPFC, insula and secondary somatosensory cortex", and suggested that these were similar to "activation of brain regions previously observed during experiences like social bonding and musical frisson".[29]
Hi – does anyone here dislike the strange sensation they get? I started getting this about 4 months ago and didn’t know what it was until I stumbled upon these pages! I only really get it when I’ve been in a fairly lengthy conversation with someone – to be honest I think it’s nerves that triggers mine? I’m not sure though because the conversation can have been going a long time before it happens. It could just be the personal attention I read about. I really don’t like the feeling as it feels as if my head is rocking even though it probably isn’t, and I feel like I look like an idiot! When it starts I have to focus to stop the odd head moving feeling and it’s putting me off getting into these long chats!!
I’ve always had this triggered by intense personal attention on either me or something I’ve done. In particular, having someone stare intently at something I’ve written or drawn on paper (or imagining/remembering that type of incident) triggers it very consistently. Intensely focused photography of myself or a body part (not sexual) also is very effective. I was recently watching a sporting event and noticing the camera tracking the athletes – just imagining how the athlete would feel with this non-stop camera attention was also a trigger. Dentists don’t really do it for me, but regular checkups with any sort of focused attention on any body part works. There’s something about the very concept of another person finding either me or my ideas/thoughts interesting enough to examine at length. A glance is just not enough. It’s kinda funny but this has triggered like a dozen times just while writing this comment out and thinking about these things!
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That could be the beginnings of asmr yes. This is how it starts for me but I don’t always need to be touched to get it the tingling can start by watching an ASMR video or seeing something in everyday life that will trigger it also. Maybe look on YouTube and try out a few different videos and see if you trigger but even if you don’t that doesn’t mean you don’t have it. Some aren’t triggered by artificial means and need a genuine real life trigger to feel ASMR. Just try out different things or get someone to play with your hair for a while and you will know for sure if you have it.
OH.MY.GOD. I just read an article in, of all places, the Daily Mail (I know, shame on me) which lead me to this. I have tried a few times to explain this sensation to people and they look at me like I’m deranged, so I stopped. And then I discover here that it’s a real ‘thing’, and then I discover someone whose trigger is exactly the same as mine! Other people touching things that belong to me! That’s it. It only happens then. The last time it happened was when my children were babies and people touched them. Before that it was things like my pencil case or books when I was at school. Then, when I was older, it was things like my make up bag. Weird. Anyway, I hear ya, and I’m so amused to have discovered that other people have it too. 

There are deeper meanings to "bliss". As more and more people mature, process their emotions and connect with others and their true purposes, "bliss" will happen between more and more people. Basically it's asexual, a bit pleasurable but more importantly it wakes up more areas of the brain/body-complex. People processing this need to activate their bodies more in other to balance the maturing mind/spirit-aspects of their being ("grounding"), and the physical activity may also help with backpains. The tendency of such people is to be a bit too seclusive, so need to remember to assert oneself more as well.
Like many corners of the internet, there’s also a sense of comradery in being outside the norm. According to the Instagram user who runs an chalk-eating ASMR repost account, this has helped build trust in the community. “We all know we are a little left of average in what we find stimulates our ASMR experience, so there’s solidarity and kinship as well," the user said.
In a series of Instagram direct messages, the woman who runs the self-described "ASMR-PICA" account @tasteetastetastik told Motherboard that although she does not believe that she has pica, she got into the community after several months of using Instagram for voyeurism and making foam-focused ASMR videos. “Well I didn’t start eating it [chalk] until I was faced with stress,” she said. “Had some reoccuring family issues and it kind of propelled from there.”
Sounds like just normal. When you feel it you know it. That jumping around sensation can start just like yours did. Mine starts at the base of my neck traveling up like the hairs on the back of my neck are standing up, but more relaxing and very nice. Feel like giggling inside, then shoots up to my scalp and down my arms and waves travel everywhere. Whole thing can be over in a few seconds. Experiencing the trigger over again still produces symptoms but maybe not so much/or in different places. You get to feel kind of drugged. I may not feel it if I listen to a song I love from beginning to end, but will if it’s a snippet of the chorus or lead up to it. A few minutes ago I got triggered from hearing a sample from iTunes of a song I bought recently. That song has a lot of trigger types in it. Sounds like whispers or gentle waves, light tapping beats, breathy singing, violins.
I thought everyone gets this ??? I’ve just discovered it’s called ASMR by accident, russell brand has done a YouTube video on it . I then went on to look for myself what it was. I then realised the sensation it was aiming at ,, the one I get all the time if I listen to a nice female call centre agent for example on the phone if I’m being sold something, I sonetimes even drag it out but then I get paranoid they know what I’m doing…. As I said I thought everyone had this sensation , I did try and describe it to my mother earlier and she didn’t know what I was talking about ,,, now I find this sort of information that not everyone gets it and I can watch these videos and get it on tap ,,,,,,, what does this mean????? I am interested in meditation too but never actually got anything amazing from it,,, does this mean Asmr is some way of meditation?? Amazing if true , how cool! Peace xx
Over the past few years, videos like this have exploded in popularity on the platform. Millions are tuning in to watch strangers whisper into their microphones, tap their fingernails, fold napkins, or roleplay as a comforting nurse—all to help viewers experience a tingling, relaxing feeling known as autonomous sensory meridian response, or ASMR. It may seem bizarre and uncomfortably intimate and maybe even a little creepy the first time you watch an ASMR video, but the creators behind these videos have a truly benevolent intent: to help their views relax, fall asleep, and find relief from the stress of their everyday lives.
I just discovered I was capable of triggering tingles on purpose this past month, after it popped into my head one day to seek out a video of a cat grooming itself (my trigger) to see if I could purposely trigger that weird relaxing feeling that I had experienced occasionally growing up, but had never really fully thought about. So that was pleasant. Then oddly enough a week ago I attempted to articulate this experience to a friend at a party (not knowing the term ASMR – nor even aware that it was a known thing, I simply described it as this peaceful, totally non-sexual, relaxed feeling I get from watching cats grooming themselves). Against all odds, this friend said, “oh, you’re probably experiencing ASMR – you should look it up.” Needless to say – it’s nice to find that indeed there’s an entire community of people online that have the same capability. Thought I’d share my experience and ask a couple questions.
That could be the beginnings of asmr yes. This is how it starts for me but I don’t always need to be touched to get it the tingling can start by watching an ASMR video or seeing something in everyday life that will trigger it also. Maybe look on YouTube and try out a few different videos and see if you trigger but even if you don’t that doesn’t mean you don’t have it. Some aren’t triggered by artificial means and need a genuine real life trigger to feel ASMR. Just try out different things or get someone to play with your hair for a while and you will know for sure if you have it.

I myself never knew what ASMR was until later in life and to be honest I cannot say that I really remember feeling the tingles when I was younger. I found out about ASMR through videos of people doing hair and makeup tutorials. This has been about 1 year ago and since then I have fell in love the ideas of what goes on in the neural levels of ASMR interactions. Please feel free to visit my blog to learn more about what I would like to accomplish with ASMR and cognitive behavioral therapy! http://hncarter.weebly.com/blog
Having had enough not so good conditions (bipolar, ADD, panic attacks), it feels so good to have this one! Since ASMR seems to be triggered by so many things, I'm with the people who get tingly responses from certain types of touch (massage, scalp massage) and certain sounds (put me on on a boat or train and I'm in happyland). Strangely, whispering, tapping, folding laundry have no effect at all or are even annoying. Have also bought a few hypnosis CDs and they actually irritate the crap out of me and I hate guided meditation! But soft speaking voices are my main non-physical trigger. If I listen to certain presenters on Radio National Australia, This American Life etc, I can't drive because it's too hypnotic. Very blissful though :). For those who have the condition, you'll find your trigger even if it's not in the top 5.
I’m not sure if I have asmr or not but I’ve never felt this feeling or some thing similar to this at all but I felt it 8times while playing battlefield hardline today but I know it not from that. When it happens I get a small tingly sensation and it’s warm and fuzzey and feels nice but not strong enough to make me really relaxed. I don’t know why but when ever I feel this and close my eyes and relax my muscles, it seems to last a little longer then if I move around. I know this isn’t frission because I don’t get energized by it but it makes me want to sleep.also I have aspergers, ADD and ADHD. I’m not sure if this makes it so I can or can’t feel this or not. can some one please reply?
Well. I started getting ASMR or Empathic Enlightenment as I called it, since the late 70’s. At a family gathering in ’79, I spoke with an old hippie Artist, a Painter, a friend of my mothers, who told me it was “Enlightenment”. Empathy for a moment shared he said. He too, was inflicted with the ability, and spoke in a hushed tone about it, Bob Dylans “Hurricane” played in the background, as he told me about the metaphysical and artistic side of life. I never forgot that night, and “Hurricane” is still my favourite song.

However, the truly novel findings came from a second experiment, when 110 participants viewed ASMR videos while connected to biological feedback machinery. After watching the videos, the heart rates of people with ASMR slowed on average by more than three beats per minute. And their skin conductance levels—a measure of physiological arousal – were significantly increased compared to those in the non-ASMR group.
ASMR's main draws, as Richard explained, are the feelings it can create. When a person hears whispering, crinkling, tapping, or other ASMR triggers, they experience tingling sensations throughout their body. But the physical sensations aren't the only reasons people watch ASMR content. A 2017 study found that 41% of respondents watch ASMR videos to help them fall asleep, while 59% watch to relax.
Sleep and Relax ASMR is a weekly podcast that creates audio experiences designed to help people sleep and relax. The show uses various ASMR triggers including whispers, gentle speaking, relaxing background noise, and general ambiance to help people unwind and relax from their busy lives. Our goal is to create the best ASMR content possible. Whether you enjoy the sound of soothing waves, snow crunching on a mountain, a soft spoken ramble, or whispered storytelling, Sleep and Relax ASMR has your ASMR needs covered. Check out Sleep and Relax ASMR and Friends for more ASMR content. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sleepandrelaxasmr/support.Read more »
Just curious if I’m alone in this– I don’t get ASMR from physical sounds or sensations, but I get it VERY strong from certain songs or concepts that have emotional impact, or from having an understanding of some sensory experience (such as a song) that I didn’t before. It doesn’t matter whether the emotion means anything to me, personally, but if the singer sounds like they mean it it’s a trigger.

This is Maria, a 28-year-old Russian expat in suburban Maryland, starring in a YouTube video that has been viewed more than 7 million times. Hundreds of thousands of Maria’s devotees return again and again to listen to her hushed whispers as she assumes simulated roles — librarian, hairstylist, masseuse — and performs simple motions: folding towels, blowing smoke from an incense burner, flipping through the pages of a magazine.
What I want to discuss with the ASMR community is misophonia. In short, misophonia is a selective sound sensitivity syndrome involving strong dislike or hatred for certain sounds. While I gain pleasure and comfort from many sounds there are other sounds that stimulate frustration and anger. I used to become enraged at the dinner table growing up when hearing family members chew food. I have learned to manage the responses but there are quite a few triggers which lead to the anger.

If you want more ASMR-related videos, then hop on over to /r/ASMR on Reddit and join 165,000+ other users who also enjoy head tingles. If craftsmanship and meticulous work is one of your triggers, then be sure to check out our list of fascinating artisan videos 8 Fascinating Artisan Videos That Everyone Should Watch 8 Fascinating Artisan Videos That Everyone Should Watch Have you ever watched a masterful expert perform their work with such skill and passion that you had no choice but to watch and admire in awe? As I scour the Internet from day to... Read More .

On June 3 2018, Makenna Kelly, a 13-year old from Fort Collins, Colorado, uploaded the video that propelled her to internet stardom. Entitled “Eating Raw Honeycomb – EXTREMELY Sticky Mouth Sounds”, it featured the teen chewing fistfuls of pure honeycomb directly in front of a microphone for 16 minutes. In the following months, it was viewed 12 million times. By October, Kelly had reached one million YouTube subscribers.

Sounds like just normal. When you feel it you know it. That jumping around sensation can start just like yours did. Mine starts at the base of my neck traveling up like the hairs on the back of my neck are standing up, but more relaxing and very nice. Feel like giggling inside, then shoots up to my scalp and down my arms and waves travel everywhere. Whole thing can be over in a few seconds. Experiencing the trigger over again still produces symptoms but maybe not so much/or in different places. You get to feel kind of drugged. I may not feel it if I listen to a song I love from beginning to end, but will if it’s a snippet of the chorus or lead up to it. A few minutes ago I got triggered from hearing a sample from iTunes of a song I bought recently. That song has a lot of trigger types in it. Sounds like whispers or gentle waves, light tapping beats, breathy singing, violins.
This is Maria, a 28-year-old Russian expat in suburban Maryland, starring in a YouTube video that has been viewed more than 7 million times. Hundreds of thousands of Maria’s devotees return again and again to listen to her hushed whispers as she assumes simulated roles — librarian, hairstylist, masseuse — and performs simple motions: folding towels, blowing smoke from an incense burner, flipping through the pages of a magazine.
While many colloquial and formal terms used and proposed between 2007 and 2010 included reference to orgasm, there was during that time a significant majority objection to its use among those active in online discussions, many of whom have continued to persist in differentiating the euphoric and relaxing nature of ASMR from sexual arousal.[citation needed] However, by 2015, a division had occurred within the ASMR community over the subject of sexual arousal, with some creating videos categorized as ASMRotica (ASMR erotica), which are deliberately designed to be sexually stimulating.[8][9]
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