Of course, when I go looking for it, these things won't give me shivers but it's very calming and pleasurable. There are also other singers and bands like Digital Daggers, Kanon Wakeshima, Lacey Sturm, etc., that could give you shivers and such. Also I like to listen to classical type music, music boxes, pianos, violins, soundtracks, like fantasy type music composed by people like Peter Gundry, a very famous violinist named Lindsey Stirling, soundtracks from RWBY or Vampire Knight, etc. These may not actually be asmr but it could be very shiver inducing and pleasurable.
I have definitely had this sensation many times from sexual activities, or leading up to them, as foreplay. Also while masturbating from about age 2 and up, instinctively using effleurage upon my own skin, as I comforted myself to help me sleep. I don’t see why anyone would be troubled if this phenomenon is associated with sexuality. It is undoubtedly sensual, and so is sex, so it is natural for there to be some overlap.
Never heard of ASMR before stumbling on these videos on Prime. They sure seemed weird after I took a few quick looks. So... I looked up ASMR. Not much scientific research on it. Hardly any interest showing. But among the people whom it works for, the interest is huge. Apparently, large e-communities sprang up in a grass roots fashion. There are even genres and sub- genres, from what I can tell from looking into it over the last week. The guy in this video is one of the creative people exploring these positive effects that can be brought out in some people. I was surprised as hell that this video was pleasant and relaxing to me. No "tingles" for me but much relaxation. Apparently different people react to different sounds, visuals, rhythms, etc. I commend this guy and others for exploring this new-to-me aspect of at least some of us humans. If this sounds interesting to you, look into the efforts of this guy and others. Maybe you will be surprised, as I was, to find value in some of their works. Cheers! And use headphones or at least ear buds, not speakers.
There's even a fine line between what will relax someone and help them fall asleep and what actually brings on the tingles. "White noise and nature sounds are very helpful for relaxation and sleep induction because they mask background sounds. ASMR-inducing sounds—gentle voices, soft crinkling, light tapping—can also do this, but they're even more relaxing," says Richard.
So. I found out about this roughly… an hour ago. And holy… what an hour it’s been. I didn’t even know I could feel this type of stuff (although for most it seems to be in their head/scalp/neck etc, for me, it’s in my chest.). My biggest trigger seem to be taps… from the crisp tap to a low thump. One thing I am noticing though, is how many girls do the videos (I can understand this, as a female voice generally has a more relaxing effect.) but I was wondering how many people prefer a male voice? Any preference to accents, etc.

The sounds most people like for ASMR vides are like my personal Misphonia trigger, but there’s lots of nice sounds that make my brain tingle. Wind chimes, seagulls, ocean waves, crickets, sawing wood, dry toothbrushing (no paste or water), rain, rivers, bubble wrap popping, sand moving, sharp object moving slowly on cardboard, flipping the pages of a thick book with thin pages, osculating fans, blinds being drawn, a can of soda being opened, extremely loud hardstyle techno music, purring cats, meowing, the stapler & staple remover, tea kettle just as it starts to boil, the coffee maker, fire, strong wind rustling through trees or fall leaves when you kick your way through them, vocoders, guitar riffs, chiptunes, pan frying, the sound a gas stove makes when you turn it on, pool splashing.
A few weeks ago, Maria says, she was contacted by a young woman whose grandmother was in a hospice. The elderly woman was no longer very responsive, but when the granddaughter played Maria’s videos, “it made her grandmother happy and calmed her down,” Maria says, recalling the woman’s message. “She said, ‘This is so great, because we don’t know how else to help her.’ ”

"Good evening, this is Maria again with you. This video is going to be dedicated to your relaxation," says the young, blond woman in a soft voice. She moves slowly from the left side of your screen to the right, and you feel her whispering voice deep within each ear. She picks up a hairbrush, running her fingernails along the bristles and tapping the back of it. She blows into your ear and tickles you with a feather. As the video continues, you begin to feel increasingly relaxed and your eyes droop. The whole time she is speaking gently to you. "We come home and we want to relax," she whispers, petting the camera. "We want someone to pat us on the head and say how good we are. We want someone to comfort us, to tell us that we're so great...that we're appreciated. You are appreciated."


Midwestern kindness runs deep, but throughout the city's neighborhoods, it turns out some residents are more polite than others (or simply complain less). Digital Third Coast, a Chicago-based digital marketing firm, recently analyzed 2018 data of complaints to 311 from the 30 most densely populated neighborhoods. They looked at noise, garbage and dog poop complaints to determine where residents were less than pleased with their surroundings. How did your 'hood fair? Click through to see which 10 city locales yielded the most complaints per capita.  (Darcel Rockett)
If ASMR has made its way into commercials, what’s next? Richard said it is creeping into other media forms. In fact, there are two ASMR movies in production. “Imagine a full-length ASMR video produced by a large studio with a big budget with a goal to make it an amazing ASMR experience. That is a movie you are going to want to see over and over if you experience ASMR anyway.”

I have always had AMSR but thought that it happened to everyone. I started watching trigger videos about 3 years ago, however my biggest trigger (not one that anyone else has and also one I don’t get to frequently engage in) is rubbing my bare feet on unfinished wood. Those tingles are ridiculously strong. I need to find a dock somewhere… I feel bad for people who don’t experience this.
I just recently learned of ASMR even though I’ve been experiencing the sensation my whole life. What I find so funny is how many ASMR fans and artists love Bob Ross. My family always joked at how much I loved watching Bob Ross growing up and I was never able to fully describe to them the sensations I was feeling. I used to seek out sounds that gave me the ASMR sensations and discovered there were many of them.
Of course, Kelly — who was named one of Teen Vogue’s “21 under 21” in November 2018 — is not the only star in the ASMR internet community. The current largest ASMR artist, or “ASMRtist”, on YouTube, Taylor Darling, aka ASMR Darling, has two million subscribers and earns an estimated $1,000 a day in advertising revenue. Global megabrands such as IKEA, Sony, McDonald’s and Toyota have now all created ASMR-inspired adverts, and in October 2018, platinum rapper Cardi B made an ASMR video that went on to be viewed nearly 10,000,000 times. It’s no longer surprising that 75 per cent of children want to be YouTubers, but these kids don’t want to be the next beauty-blogging Zoella or game-streaming PewDiePie. They want to be the next brain-tingling ASMR Darling.
I attribute it to my son in spirit being present. It didn’t happen to me until after he died. I can’t control it and comes at random times, I’m not able to pinpoint it. It comes in every quadrant of my head at various times of the day and some day’s only a few times. Lately it’s often and much stronger. I thought perhaps because we are within several weeks of first anniversary of his death.
There is no solid data about ASMR, no published research studies — not yet. The term “ASMR” is nonclinical, coined in 2010 by a woman named Jennifer Allen who started an ASMR Facebook group and later became part of a team — along with Richard — that collected and analyzed anecdotal information about the sensation. Richard also notes the work of Bryson Lochte, a Dartmouth College undergrad who has used neuroimaging technology to study ASMR for his senior thesis but has not published his results.
Finally something to explain my “photocopier man” feeling which has been a standard joke in our family. I first discovered this feeling when I was a teenager working in an office where a repair man would come regularly to maintain the photocopier and I would experience this sensation of well-being while he was working. It was in a fairly small office and usually he would clean the screen with an acetone base cleaner so I always thought that the fumes from that created a mini “high”. I have had it at various times usually when there is someone repairing something in the office eg putting data cables, fixing sockets etc. I now work in a research lab and have had it when participants are in another room being tested with senors on their heads and I have no visual or auditory input from them just the sense of them being there. I have had it to a lesser extent from acupuncture and find massage of any kind extremely unpleasant. It’s nice to find out that it’s not just me that has this strange feeling for no apparent reason.
I just discovered I was capable of triggering tingles on purpose this past month, after it popped into my head one day to seek out a video of a cat grooming itself (my trigger) to see if I could purposely trigger that weird relaxing feeling that I had experienced occasionally growing up, but had never really fully thought about. So that was pleasant. Then oddly enough a week ago I attempted to articulate this experience to a friend at a party (not knowing the term ASMR – nor even aware that it was a known thing, I simply described it as this peaceful, totally non-sexual, relaxed feeling I get from watching cats grooming themselves). Against all odds, this friend said, “oh, you’re probably experiencing ASMR – you should look it up.” Needless to say – it’s nice to find that indeed there’s an entire community of people online that have the same capability. Thought I’d share my experience and ask a couple questions.
But the phenomenon has nonetheless burst into the mainstream, thanks to mounting media coverage and a few high-profile references: “Saturday Night Live” alum Molly Shannon gushed to Conan O’Brien about her “head orgasms,” induced by the methodical touch of airport security pat-downs; novelist Andrea Seigel shared her experience with ASMR on the radio program “This American Life” last year; the “Dr. Oz” show has featured ASMR videos as a way to ease insomnia.

Because ASMR is such an individualistic experience, different triggers affect some people more than others. Not everyone experiences ASMR to the same intensity and the effects can differ from person to person. However, ASMR is most commonly described as a pleasurable "tingling" sensation that begins in your scalp and creeps its way down your neck and your back, sometimes spreading out to the limbs. Others describe it as "goosebumps on the brain" and "warm chills," a shivering feeling you might get if someone was gently tracing their finger down your spine. Some say it's like the pins and needles sensation when your foot falls asleep, but pleasurable instead of painful. These tingles are always accompanied by an overwhelming feeling of peaceful relaxation and euphoria; many people report feeling their anxiety slip away, and they often fall asleep afterword.
There are some ASMR triggers which you will find reoccur regularly in ASMR videos. Everyone’s personal triggers will vary slightly, what works for other people won’t necessarily work for you. Running through the list of triggers below might help you find new ASMR triggers that you didn’t know about, or hadn’t thought of before. Or if you are not sure whether you experience ASMR yourself, have a look at the list and you should be able to tell by the end. Remember, these are just the most common, and won’t necessarily work for everyone, so don’t worry if they don’t all give you tingles.
The story follows Tom More, a psychiatrist living in a dystopian future who develops a device called the Ontological Lapsometer that, when traced across the scalp of a patient, detects the neurochemical correlation to a range of disturbances. In the course of the novel, More admits that the 'mere application of his device' to a patient's body 'results in the partial relief of his symptoms'.[20]
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