It turns out I had experienced my first incident of autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR), though I would not find that out until earlier this year when I researched hypnosis videos on YouTube that supposedly help you sleep better. ASMR isn’t a phenomenon confirmed by science, and it’s only in recent years, after people across the world began to report their ASMR experiences on the web, that scientists have even started to study it.
Some ASMR video creators use binaural recording techniques to simulate the acoustics of a three-dimensional environment, reported to elicit in viewers and listeners the experience of being in close proximity to actor and vocalist.[33] Binaural recordings are usually made using two microphones, just like stereo recordings. However, in binaural recordings the two microphones tend to be more specially designed to mimic ears on humans. In many cases, microphones are separated the same distance as ears are on humans, and microphones are surrounded by ear-shaped cups to get similar reverb as human ears.
On June 3 2018, Makenna Kelly, a 13-year old from Fort Collins, Colorado, uploaded the video that propelled her to internet stardom. Entitled “Eating Raw Honeycomb – EXTREMELY Sticky Mouth Sounds”, it featured the teen chewing fistfuls of pure honeycomb directly in front of a microphone for 16 minutes. In the following months, it was viewed 12 million times. By October, Kelly had reached one million YouTube subscribers.
Aside from the pleasurable sensation that ASMR offers there are a range of other benefits. Many intentional ASMR videos are essentially forms of guided meditations, meditating regularly has been shown to reduce stress levels and aid concentration among many other things. For a lot of people ASMR is a gateway to developing an ongoing meditative practice. 
Then, slime arrived. Personally, it’s a no from me, with its videos of hands plunging into the sticky depths of squelching, rainbow-colored goo or a sequin-stuffed mass that crackles as it’s manipulated. It looks good, sure, but slime doesn’t make a sound that in any way feels satisfying, calming or hypnotic, the way really good vocal ASMR does for me. And so maybe it’s just as well rowdy garage-rock group Drenge—brothers Eoin and Rory Loveless, who are joined live by bassist Rob Graham – have ripped the piss out of chirpy YouTubers in a new music video that’s all about slime. It’s… absurd, in a good way. Here’s a bit of what they had to say about it, in a sort of 700-word mission statement almost as batshit as the concept itself.
You feel quite literally, euphoric, but quite. A moment of deep reflection mixed with an even deeper empathic connection with the subject or sound, And as you grow up, your empahic abilities grow as well, you learn more about the world around you. You may have had a brutal upbringing, You may carry the weight of the world on your shoulders. But you see things differently, you may be gifted, no trauma at all in your life so far, touch wood. For me, it happens while practicing a shared love (graffiti/drawing, in my case) A shared activity (relationships), a menial task (work) or shared adventure (your life), there are so many triggers. I can be alone, an get light empathic feelings for others or even a different race (suffering somewhere in this world), who aren’t even there, I’ll never even meet them. Empathy doesn’t ask permission, it is permission! We are waaaay past that point now people! Spiritually, physically, mentally, we are connected.
Even if the Internet has led researchers to the discovery of a previously unknown sensory phenomenon, there are still plenty of challenges ahead. There are many unanswered questions, like why only certain people experience ASMR, what percentage of the population they make up, and whether those who never have can be triggered to experience it. More immediately, there’s the ever-present challenge of getting funding to better understand an experience that still raises skepticism. Smith says that the term ASMR still “comes across as a little bit new-agey in the scientific world.”
If you watch ASMR slime videos (or just any old ASMR videos) to go to sleep, Winter says there's no reason why you should stop. “It’s the 2017 version of counting sheep,” he says. “If you feel like it’s enhancing your ability to fall asleep, that’s great.” However, if you find that you struggle to go to sleep without watching an ASMR video, he recommends taking a break from videos every now and then and mentally conjuring up the image of someone massaging slime or having their hair brushed. That, too, should help kick you into relaxation mode and help you catch some zzzs.
Satisfying Slime ASMR: With close to 1.5 million subscribers, this is the go-to channel for crunchy slime videos. They post multiple videos a day, all related to slime, games, and toys. Their videos fit into several series related to food slimes, DIY (do it yourself) slimes, cutting stress balls open, and ASMR-specific slimes. Their most popular video about rainbow slime has over 45 million views!
ASMR stands for Autonomous sensory Meridian response — Autonomous sensory Meridian response. Expresses reaction to a certain vision,hearing,perception.Viewing these movies ASMR elicits a certain physiological response.The sensations from ASMR videos should be fine and just to relax after a hard day's work. ASMR triggers that cause this reaction can be attributed only to a pleasant soothing sound, including slime ASMR sounds.
Jacob Daniel is clearly a savvy child – although excitable and eccentric, he talks soberly about safety on YouTube, clapping his hands as he tells children to “be, be safe”. He tells kids to use fake names, access their email with VPNs, and avoid making custom Skype calls with viewers. For all his intelligence, however, Daniel is still a child. He and Prunkl show off a series of wigs they play with at home – he dons a purple one with red horns; Prunkl shows me her doll. They talk excitedly about the pranks they play on the public, wearing the wigs to order food in take-away shops.
“If you can’t experience it you’re gonna either think it’s weird or you’re gonna think it’s creepy,” Hunnicutt says. Aoki – now playing with her toys in the corner of the room – thinks aloud. “IT’S NOT CREEPY!” she shouts emphatically (although it’s worth noting that with her childish rhotacism, it comes out as “cweepy”). Like many ASMRtists, she notes that these videos help people with insomnia, PTSD and stress. “I mean there’s always some weirdos in the world, but you can’t stop helping others just because there are those people.”
But the video doesn’t work on me the way it’s supposed to. For many of her fans, Maria’s voice causes a sensation the Internet has dubbed ASMR—autonomous sensory meridian response. Those who get ASMR describe the experience as a tingling inside their heads, or a head rush. Sometimes the sensation extends down their backs or limbs. It’s often referred to as a brain-gasm, but counterintuitively, it’s also supposed to be relaxing, a mellow feeling. Some people watch the videos to help them sleep at night. And even without the tingles, it is sort of relaxing, if you can get past the dissonance of someone whispering in your ear while you scroll through Twitter in your cubicle, or whatever.
Some ASMR video creators use binaural recording techniques to simulate the acoustics of a three-dimensional environment, reported to elicit in viewers and listeners the experience of being in close proximity to actor and vocalist.[33] Binaural recordings are usually made using two microphones, just like stereo recordings. However, in binaural recordings the two microphones tend to be more specially designed to mimic ears on humans. In many cases, microphones are separated the same distance as ears are on humans, and microphones are surrounded by ear-shaped cups to get similar reverb as human ears.

Maria says that she hears from subscribers, including doctors and psychologists, who are excited by the ASMR research. But mostly, she gets thank-you notes — from people with anxiety or sleep disorders, from overwhelmed college students struggling through exam week, from military veterans who tell her that her videos offer a sense of calm that they can’t find elsewhere.


The most popular stuff discussed amongst ASMR community is whispering and tapping – and I get it a bit from that – but one thing is, I know that when the person is addressing me (or the camera as it may be), that seems to dispel ASMR for me. In fact, I’d say a pre-req for me to ASMR is that I am in the role of passive observer – perhaps that speaks to my personality? I know I have introverted tendencies. That leads me to the first of my questions:
There’s been suspicion that ASMR is a sexual pursuit, fueled by the fact that many ASMRtists are attractive young women and that cleavage is not exactly foreign to the medium. The comments beneath videos routinely make much of the ASMRtists’ attractiveness, and terms like “braingasms” and “whisper porn” are often bandied about. But in the Swansea study, only 5 percent of respondents reported using it for sexual stimulation. Granted, this is self-reported data, but the results must be vindicating to ASMRheads who find themselves battling unsavory rumors about their nighttime video-watching habits.
It seems at the moment that the answer is no. Not everybody reports experiencing this sensation. Most people discover it by accident in their childhood, however some adults experience it for the first time. If you haven’t experienced ASMR before, it might just be that you haven’t found your personal triggers yet. Check out our article detailing the common triggers to see if any of them do it for you.
OMG I thought I was alone this whole time (and I am almost 30 years old). I thought I was strange and I thought I just was (and I hate to use this word but I don’t know another one to choose at this moment), attracted to these sounds.. even the Bob Ross one. I have loved the way certain sounds resonate with me ever since I was a very small child. I have purposefully bought movies and kept recorded TV shows on my DVR just so I can replay certain parts with the sounds and people’s voices that have triggered for me. I feel so relieved and happy to know there is a whole community of people just like me. This is actually the first time I have ever told a single person about my feelings on this. I have kept it hidden for years thinking someone would find me strange. I can’t even begin to describe the relief I feel knowing other people experience these triggers and feelings. I am excited to explore this further.
“For me, something about when kids whisper, it’s, oh my god, it’s so relaxing,” says Desireé Hunnicutt, Aoki’s mother, who started watching ASMR videos in 2011. Hunnicutt says she was motivated to create the AMSR Toddler channel in order to help people. “I see comments where people are like, ‘Oh my goodness, I watch every night and it helps me fall asleep,’” she says. “To me that’s perfect, that’s what we’re trying to do.”
Yes. Mostly cognitive for me as well. I’ve experienced it hundreds of times while watching movies during particularly tender, deeply emotional, or intellectually stimulating scenes when the actors/narrators speak thoughts that resonate with me. I have also experienced this at church when someone reads scripture or teaches on a subject that suddenly triggers an “aha moment” for me; a feeling of revelation and connection to what I perceive is the spirit of God. Your comment was made a year ago, but I hope you read my response.
2. Do you get rush through the spine and scalp when catching adrenaline? For example, while doing sports and trying to boost myself even further, I watch Zombie pov clips, like this one – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvICHck3PIg, I get huge rush of adrenaline up the spine and neck, because I feel like I’m running in that clip. But I also get peaks of euphoric rush in my head and I scratch the scalp, the crown of the head in circles. It’s definitely not ASMR I am experiencing, but the same thing – scratching the crown of the head is attributed to both, ASMR and this.
This image from video provided by Michelob shows a frame from their 2019 Super Bowl commercial for Michelob Ultra Pure Gold. The ad features the actress Zoe Kravitz using techniques for autonomous sensory meridian response, or ASMR. It is described as a tingly euphoric response, usually starting on the head and scalp, and sometimes spreading down the neck, arms or back. (Michelob ULTRA via AP)
Jacob Daniel is clearly a savvy child – although excitable and eccentric, he talks soberly about safety on YouTube, clapping his hands as he tells children to “be, be safe”. He tells kids to use fake names, access their email with VPNs, and avoid making custom Skype calls with viewers. For all his intelligence, however, Daniel is still a child. He and Prunkl show off a series of wigs they play with at home – he dons a purple one with red horns; Prunkl shows me her doll. They talk excitedly about the pranks they play on the public, wearing the wigs to order food in take-away shops.

Another article, "Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state", by Nick Davis and Emma Barratt, lecturer and post-graduate researcher respectively in the Department of Psychology at Swansea University, was published in PeerJ. This article aimed to 'describe the sensations associated with ASMR, explore the ways in which it is typically induced in capable individuals ... to provide further thoughts on where this sensation may fit into current knowledge on atypical perceptual experiences ... and to explore the extent to which engagement with ASMR may ease symptoms of depression and chronic pain'[4] The paper was based on a study of 245 men, 222 women, and 8 individuals of non-binary gender, aged from 18 to 54 years, all of whom had experienced ASMR, and regularly consumed ASMR media, from which the authors concluded and suggested that 'given the reported benefits of ASMR in improving mood and pain symptoms...ASMR warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic measure similar to that of meditation and mindfulness.'
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